I know that I complain a lot about life here at MCC and the fact of the matter is there is much to complain about. It does not take long for a host of issues to come flooding to the fore of my mind including things such as the piss-poor medical care and staff. The constant jerking of the inmate chain by CO’s for their humor comes to mind as well. The thing is this: I really don’t give a rats-ass myself about much that goes on around here.

It may come as a surprise that I am not a complainer by nature; I am not. What I have here, what I do here is bring the voice of the inmates (and others; including dirty laundry) to a blogging audience and presence. I am for good and bad, really nothing more than an ear. I listen to what is being said about campus. I listen to the inmates bitch and moan. I listen to the CO’s piss and moan. I listen to everything I can possibly listen to then turn in into a short blog; hopefullly with a witty and cutting edge.

So here comes one little piece of listening; with comment of course!

The other day at chow; I overheard a few guys bitching about the prospect that they may get stripped searched everytime when leaving an industry job (in this case the wood shop) including strip searches before lunches. To say these men were less than happy campers is an understatement. The thing is: these men were inclined to bitch as opposed to act. One thing that is perfectly clear  to me is how much un-tapped power inmates have over the system. Too power to affect change here at MCC by the inmates is never used. It is not used because the Inmates (as I see it)are too god-damned busy using all their energy and resources eating their own. I am not a career criminal and am not fully aware of all the rules of “inmatehood;” but it seems to me that if the inmates turned their focus on the system rather than each other change would come howbeit slowly. Inmates here, and I suspect across our nation are so worried about the skinner or ripper, or the guy who cuts in line at chow; the guy who got the bigger piece; the guy who does’t look right; the guy who doesn’t shower everyday, they have no energy left or desire left to affect change. They would rather piss and moan just as I am doing now.

But, I have an idea though:

I think if the inmates stood up and said we don’t want to be stripped search 2 or 3 times a day and walked off the job… Done…! FINISHED…! Things would change! If all the inmates walked out of all the industries jobs that cash cow would dry up over night. If all the inmates supported those in the industries by walking away from their jobs in the kitchen or pods things would change even if the inmates went hungry for a few days… I the fore mentioned, men walked away from the work crews? What if they walked away from the school syste? What if they just said in one big 600-700 man voice; “We are as mad as hell and we are not going to take it anymore?” What if they said this across the coreec tions nation?

In my opinion inmates need a loose-knit trade union, just like the CO’s and other have. I think they need men chosen from amongst themselves to represent them, just like the CO’ and others have. The inmates have the numbers, they could hve the voice too if they wanted it… They just have to stop eating their own long enough to see if they wanted to, change could come to MCC and to like institutions across the nation.

Let me make one thing perfectly clear, I am not advocating this position amongst the inmates (but I will write about it;) the inmates need to wake up and see this on their own…

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The medical treatment program addresses addiction, provides inmates resources after their release

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Image by Arline Lawless, Inmate at the Maine Correctional Center

WINDHAM, Maine — A pilot program offered by the Maine Department of Corrections has been successful thus far in rehabilitating inmates with an opioid use disorder.

Under the MDOC’s Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) program, inmates with an opioid use disorder that are 90 days from their release date have the opportunity to choose a medication that will help them get off the drugs.

Officials are looking at expanding a pilot program offered by the Maine Department of Corrections to inmates living with an opioid use disorder. (Photo/MDOC)
Officials are looking at expanding a pilot program offered by the Maine Department of Corrections to inmates living with an opioid use disorder. (Photo/MDOC)

WGME reports that since the implementation of the MAT program in May, 60 inmates have enrolled and 40 have graduated. MDOC officials said 100% of the inmates who have graduated from the MAT program are actively participating in drug treatment after their release.

“This is no different that treating a diabetic or a patient with a chronic illness that needs treatment,” Maine DOC Deputy Commissioner Ryan Thornell told WGME. “There’s no reason we should not provide a treatment that we know, evidence tells us, works.”

Right now, the pilot costs $35,000 a month to run at four out of the DOC’s six facilities, according to WGME. Thornell is hopeful that the program will be expanded to two more state facilities by 2020.

“That’s going to take several million dollars to expand like that but this is a priority for the state of Maine,” Thronell told WGME. “I think we’re going to have large support to make that expansion when the time is right.”

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Kenneth McDonald

Write to Kenny via:
Maine State Prison – Kenneth McDonald – MDOC #114427
807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

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danny2
Write to Prince via:
Maine State Prison – Daniel Fortune – MDOC #86753
807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

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Joshua Dall-Leighton appears in the Alfred courtroom Monday, the first day of his trial. Dall-Leighton is accused of sexually assaulting a female inmate in his charge at the Southern Maine Reentry Center in Alfred. SHAWN PATRICK OUELLETTE/Portland Press Herald

BY MEGAN GRAY

ALFRED – The defense attorney for a former corrections officer who is on trial for sexual assault of a female inmate continued to criticize his accuser Wednesday morning.

Joshua Dall-Leighton, 34, faces five counts of gross sexual assault. He had also been charged with one count of unlawful sexual contact, but that charge was dismissed Wednesday morning for a lack of evidence.

The indictment states that Dall-Leighton had supervisory or disciplinary authority over the woman because she was in custody at the time, which would make any sexual contact illegal under state law. All of the charges are felonies, and he has pleaded not guilty.

Neal Weinstein, the defense attorney, tried to paint the woman as untruthful and opportunistic. He read explicit test messages she sent to Dall-Leighton while she was at home on furlough, including a request for a sexual photograph. But she testified that she asked for the picture because he requested one from her, and she was trying to delay or avoid sending it.His trial began Monday in York County Superior Court. The alleged victim spent hours on the witness stand Tuesday, and the cross examination continued Wednesday morning. She described five instances of oral sex or sexual intercourse in a prison transport van between December 2015 and February 2015.

“What were you going to do with that picture?” Weinstein asked.

“I don’t know,” she said. “Probably nothing.”

“You weren’t going to use it in the future to say, if you don’t give me more smoking or alcohol or do something else that I’m going to post this to tell people that you did this?”

“No, I never said that,” she answered.

Assistant District Attorney Lauren Daley later asked the woman why she sent the explicit messages if she did not want to do so.

“I didn’t want these things to happen, but it was still ongoing, and I continued to text as often as he did,” she said. “I continued to play along.”

The woman’s testimony was frequently interrupted on both days by objections from the attorneys and private conferences with the judge.

When she stepped down from the witness stand Wednesday morning, the state rested its case. The defense began its case after the lunch recess.

The first witness for the defense was also a corrections officer at the facility where Dall-Leighton worked. The alleged victim testified that she told this officer about the sexual encounters with Dall-Leighton, but Weinstein has said the officer denied that.

It is not clear whether Dall-Leighton or any other witnesses will testify.

Twelve jurors and two alternates have been present for the testimony so far. Four are women; 10 are men.

Dall-Leighton previously worked at the Southern Maine Reentry Center in Alfred, which has since moved to Windham. The facility allows women who are near the end of their sentences to go to work, school and home on furlough.

The woman was convicted in January 2012 in Rockland of elevated aggravated assault, robbery and burglary. She was sentenced to 10 years in prison with all but six years suspended. She spent part of that sentence at the re-entry center, where she met Dall-Leighton. Now 34, she was released in 2016 and is on probation. The Portland Press Herald does not identify the victims of alleged sex crimes without their consent.

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Write to Dirty via:

Maine State Prison – Michael McQuade – MDOC #82448

807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

There are three things I find so sad here at Maine Correctional Center (M.C.C.) I thought I would share them with with you. First, I find it so sad when an inmate has resolved himself to wait till his Release to receive proper medical care! That in my mind is simply tragic. I over heard some inmate talking about some liver issue that the medical staff was saying: Booze, Booze, Booze was the cause (when he first arrived:) testing six months later same issue, but no Booze to blame it on; the inmate try’s to get medical to give meds without Tylenol (he takes 90,000mg a month.) At his 1 year health review (at 17 months.) The doctor asked the inmate (why aren’t you on straight blah, blah,” The inmate complains about his repeated attempts to get things changed. He tells the doctor he’ll just wait till he gets out to get things corrected (his outside doctors did not give him meds with Tylenol.) The inmate has Two years to serve, he leaves the room the doctor does not change his meds. SO SAD…..

Secondly, the telephone… I see the telephone as the greatest source of conflict, stress, and strife to see inmates pleading w/ spouses, way ward girl friend is awful… Inmates so want to have some kind of normalcy in controlling events outside the walls. They can’t, and it tears them up… SO SAD… To bad they did not have privacy. They must exposed their frustrations to the world (Dorm) SO SAD…

Lastly, it is so sad for me to see the “Tough Guys,” “The guys who do time; the muscle bound career criminals who prey on the weak & elderly around the dorms hanging out day in and day out at the cages, swinging of CO’s nuts. Yep, it seems the toughest, the biggest, baddest boys are the real  junior CO’s…. SO SAD…..

Bob Wire

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Benjamin Schreiber, not pictured, is serving a life sentence for bludgeoning a man to death in 1996.

A court in the US has refused to release a convict who argued that he had completed his life sentence when he briefly “died”.

Benjamin Schreiber, 66, was sentenced to life without parole in Iowa for bludgeoning a man to death in 1996.

He said his sentence ended when his heart stopped during a medical emergency four years ago, even though he was revived.

But judges said Schreiber’s bid – while original – was “unpersuasive”.

They said that he was “unlikely” to be dead, as he had signed his own legal documents in the case.

In 2015, Schreiber developed septic poisoning as a result of kidney stones. He had to be resuscitated by doctors in hospital, but fully recovered and was returned to prison.

In Schreiber’s claim, filed last year, he said that he had been resuscitated against his will, and that his brief “death” meant that his life sentence had technically ended.

The district court ruled against Schreiber – a decision his lawyer took to the state’s court of appeal.

On Wednesday, the appeals court upheld the lower court’s ruling. It added that his sentence would not end until a medical examiner formally declared him dead.

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Political Prisoners

Welcome to the blog from inmates of Maine's jails and prisons.

In collaboration with the Holistic Recovery Project, the Political Prisoners Blog provides a prisoner's view into what's happening at Maine's correctional facilities.

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