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Write to Dirty via:

Maine State Prison – Michael McQuade – MDOC #82448

– 807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

How is everyone?

I guess you could say I have had a lot going on for the past few days but of course you could say I will make it for I have a lot more good going on.  As I said it is nice to hear from you guys.  I have tomorrow off but I was asked if I could come in for just a few hours.

Sorry for printing but my wrist is really killing me lately.  I guess you could say I will need to wear my brace here soon if I want to get better.  Fuck, it takes so much time when it comes to printing out letters.

I wish they would turn down the hear here for it feels as if it is set on 100 degrees but I guess my fan will come in handy for the time being.  I will write some  more later, for I should head for bed for 4:00am comes early and here it is 11:30pm.  I will be out of work at 11am but before I can get back to writing I have a few appointments I need to get done, but always keep in mind that I love and miss everyone.

I guess I close in saying this:  always keep in mind in all you do praise the Lord, give God the glory and worship.  God will bless you and help you.

In the name of God,

Bishop Joel Dudley

Christ Mission Prison Outreach Program

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Write to Joel via:

FCI Otisville – Joel Dudley, Reg. #07499-036 – PO Box 1000 – Otisville, NY 10963

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McDonald Plea
Write to Kenny via: Bolduc Correctional Facility – Kenneth McDonald, MDOC #114427 – 807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

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Image: Danny and Samantha at the Gardiner High School Prom, way back.

Contact Danny via: Maine State Prison – Daniel Fortune, #86753 – 807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

Editor’s note:  All of the prisoners featured in our blog will one day be free.  Daniel Fortune (a Haitian-American) was convicted of a home invasion (of a white, former state legislator) during which his co-conspirator committed some very bad violence, but no deaths.  Danny is serving two concurrent life sentences.  His co-conspirator (who talked) got 50.  All of the other murderers (a couple rather grotty) will be free while Danny is earning his 17th PhD. 

Really?

Danny Fortune is a good man.  And prisons are businesses.  And there’s something wrong here.  Isn’t there? – Robin Rage

https://politicalprisoner.wordpress.com/2017/05/25/life-sentence-is-too-severe-for-machete-attack-on-pittston-father-daughter-lawyer-says/

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Image: Arline Lawless, Halloween 2018

Write Arline via: Maine Correctional Center – Arline Lawless, MDOC #60057 – 17 Mallison Falls Road – Windham, Maine 04062

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Dirty

 

Write to Dirty via:

Maine State Prison – Michael McQuade, MDOC #82448 – 807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

“You just sell it like you were selling cars, or real estate, or hamburgers.

In the early 1980s, the Corrections Corporation of America pioneered the idea of running prisons for a profit. “You just sell it like you were selling cars, or real estate, or hamburgers,” one of its founders told Inc. magazine. Today, corporate-run prisons hold eight percent of America’s inmates. Here’s how the private prison industry took off:

1983

Thomas Beasley, Doctor R. Crants, and T. Don Hutto start Corrections Corporation of America, the world’s first private prison company.

1984
CCA begins operating a county jail and a juvenile detention center in Tennessee. It also opens its first privately owned facility in Houston, a motel hastily remodeled to hold immigration detainees.

1985
A federal judge orders Tennessee to stop admitting inmates to its overcrowded prisons. CCA offers, unsuccessfully, to pay $250 million for a 99-year lease on the state’s entire prison system.

1986
CCA goes public, saying its facility design and use of electronic surveillance mean it can operate larger prisons “with less staff than the public sector would have needed.”

Dog team at Winn Correctional Center

A guard dog at Winn Correctional Center in Winnfield, Louisiana
1987
Wackenhut Corrections Corporation, later known as the GEO Group, gets its first contract to run a federal immigration detention center.

1990s
Among the “model” bills ?to emerge from the American Legislative Exchange Council‘s criminal justice task force, which CCA later co-chairs, are truth-in-sentencing and three-strikes legislation that help fuel the ’90s prison boom. (CCA says it did not vote on or comment on any proposed ALEC legislation.)*

1997
Arguing that it’s in the property business, CCA becomes a real estate investment trust for tax purposes. A new affiliate, Prison Realty Trust, raises $447 million for a prison-buying spree.

Private And Public Prison Populations 1990-2014

https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/KYDjl/2/

1998
The Justice Department investigates a CCA prison in Youngstown, Ohio, following a spate of escapes, stabbings, and killings. In addition to finding inexperienced and poorly trained guards, the probe reveals that CCA took on maximum-security inmates at a facility designed for a medium-security population.

2000
As prison occupancy rates drop, Prison Realty Trust nearly goes bankrupt. CCA stock, once nearly $150 a share, falls to 19 cents. The company drops the trust and restructures.

CCA Stock Price, 1997-2016

https://datawrapper.dwcdn.net/LsEny/3/

2004
A Justice Department report finds a “disturbing degree” of physical abuse by staff and underreporting of violence among inmates at a Baltimore juvenile facility run by the private prison operator Correctional Services Corporation. CSC is later acquired by GEO.

2005
Rep. Ted Strickland (D-Ohio) introduces the Private Prison Information Act, which would require private prisons holding federal inmates to comply with Freedom of Information Act requests. It died, as have at least seven similar bills opposed by CCA and GEO.

2007

A drawing by an immigrant child held at CCA's T. Don Hutto Center.

A drawing by an immigrant child held at CCA’s T. Don Hutto Center. ACLU

CCA’s and GEO’s stock prices jump as both companies jockey to run the federal government’s expanding immigration detention centers. Meanwhile, the ACLU settles a case against Immigration and Customs Enforcement for conditions in the CCA-managed T. Don Hutto Residential Center in Texas, where about half the detainees are kids. Under the agreement, children no longer wear prison uniforms and may move more freely.

2008
The New York Times investigates the deaths of immigration detainees, such as a Guinean man at a CCA-run facility who fractured his skull and was placed in solitary confinement before being taken to a hospital. He died after four months in a coma.

2009
A CCA representative attends a meeting where ALEC members draft the legislation that will eventually become Arizona’s notorious anti-immigration law. CCA denies having a hand in writing the bill. It cuts ties with ALEC the following year.

2010
An ACLU suit alleges rampant violence at a CCA-run Idaho prison known as “gladiator school.” The lawsuit claims the prison is understaffed and fosters an environment that “relies on the degradation, humiliation, and subjugation of prisoners.” The FBI investigates but doesn’t pursue charges. In Kentucky, the governor orders all female inmates removed from a CCA prison after more than a dozen cases of alleged sexual abuse by guards.

2011
 

Inmates at Winn Correctional Center

Inmates at Winn Correctional Center

CCA becomes the first private prison company to purchase a state facility, buying Ohio’s Lake Erie Correctional Institutionas part of a privatization plan proposed by Gov. John Kasich and supported by his corrections chief, former CCA Director Gary Mohr.

 

2012
CCA offers to buy prisons in 48 states in exchange for 20-year management contracts. The same year, a GEO-operated youth facility in Mississippi where staff sexually abused minors is described by a judge as a “cesspool of unconstitutional and inhuman acts and conditions.” At another Mississippi facility, a 24-year-old CCA employee is killed during a riot over prisoners’ complaints about poor food, inadequate medical care, and disrespectful guards.

2013
CCA converts back to a real estate investment trust, as does GEO. Mother Jones reports that the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has invested $2.2 million in GEO.

2014
As it did during at least the previous five years, CCA’s annual report flags criminal justice reform—including drug decriminalization and the reduction of mandatory minimum sentences—as a “risk factor” for its business.* Chris Epps, Mississippi’s prison commissioner and the president of the American Correctional Association, is charged with taking kickbacks from a private prison contractor.

2015
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) co-sponsors the Justice is Not for Sale Act, which would ban all government contracts with private prison companies. After Hillary Clinton is criticizedfor using campaign bundlers who’d worked as lobbyists for CCA and GEO, she promises to no longer take their money and says, “We should end private prisons and private detention centers.”

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* This item has been clarified.

Misty Romero of Limington faces several charges after police say she drove through a closed accident scene, nearly hit a Gorham police office and struck six vehicles,

The Cumberland County Sheriff’s office said in a press release that Misty Romero was charged with eluding an officer and operating under the influence following the 6:40 p.m. incident that started on Route 35 in Standish. Police said a motorist had called the county dispatch center to report the 2012 Dodge Ram 2500 truck was operating erratically. The truck stopped near Route 35 and Route 237 in Standish where traffic had backed up due to a motorcycle fire on the side of Route 35. A Gorham police officer had a brief contact with Romero before she sped off nearly striking the officer. The truck drove through the backed up traffic, striking six other vehicles including two Standish fire vehicles and losing the truck’s driver’s side tire. Deputies were able to catch up with the truck which continued to operate with three tires, sending out a large trail of sparks s. The truck traveled at 40 to 85 mph for more than three miles before it became disabled. Romero and a 40-year-old passenger were taken into custody.

The passenger was not charged. Romero was ordered held for eight hours before she could pay the $1,500 bail.

Romero was also arrested on several other charges, police said.

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Political Prisoners

Welcome to the blog from inmates of Maine's jails and prisons.

In collaboration with the Holistic Recovery Project, the Political Prisoners Blog provides a prisoner's view into what's happening at Maine's correctional facilities.

Only your vigilance on the outside can guarrentee that justice goes on on the inside.

If you'd like to contact one of our inmate bloggers, send us an email.

Thanks for reading, and thanks for your support.

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