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I’m 25 years old from Maine. I have a 20 year-old fiance named and a beautiful 1 year-old son. I was arrested for selling 5 hydrocodone to a former friend of mine who was wearing a wire.

I’ve paid fines, previously for weed possession, but other than that I don’t have a record.

I was sentenced to two years with all but 3 months suspended. Right now, I’m in County Jail doing the 3 months. When I get out of here I’ll have probation for two years. That means that if I get caught drinking or using drugs in the next two years, I’ll go back to jail for two years.

I wasn’t offered the option of rehab. I’ll get released back to my home town, my family & all my old friends.

Two years for five pills. And I missed seeing my baby boy walk his first steps.

Wish me luck.

Ghost

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Hey, what’s popping?

I’ve been working on not focusing so much on the end result of things.  I bounce from one thing to another.  It’s like I don’t feel like I”m doing anything unless I’ striving for something, and then as soon as I get it or accomplish something, I’m on to the next.  I don’t even savor the accomplishment.  I really need to work on that.  Word.  Conditional reality.  That’s what I’m struggling with right now.  I need that happy core.

The falling down and getting back up is what life’s all about.  The day we stop getting back up  is when we really have problems.  I’ve learned that failure is when you give up.  It’s o.k. to make mistakes and fall down, but when we accept that and stop trying, that’s when we’ve failed.  So keep getting back up, everyone.

I can’t believe that this is the reason I self-sabotage so much.  I’m working on this, realizing this is the first step towards fixing it.  I don’t know why I hate myself; I think it’s some childhood shit.  I want you guys to know that I”m working hard to get better and be better so that when I come home I’m in the best possible space.

I’m trying to give all my problems to Allah, it’s hard though, because I’m such a control freak.  I know that He can handle everything better than I ever could so I need to start trusting in Him.  That is not stupid at all; everything is on loan to me from God, you know.  As for purpose, I am just starting to realize what my purpose isn’t.

Just know that I’m doing okay.

As I am,

Prince

danny2

Write to Prince via:

Maine State Prison = Daniel Fortune – MDOC #86753

807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

‘It’s a very good day for Downeast’: Machiasport’s new facility will retain the Downeast Correctional Facility name and house 50 prisoners and 15 staff.

MACHIASPORT, Maine — A new pre-release center will be built on the grounds of the existing property of Downeast Correctional Center in Machiasport, Gov. Janet Mills and Washington County lawmakers jointly announced Friday.

The new facility will house up to 50 minimum-security prisoners and employ 15 staff, the governor’s office said. It will also retain its name of DCF.

“It’s a very good day for Downeast,” Rep. William Tuell, R-East Machias, told NEWS CENTER Maine.

Gov. Mills’ office said the Department of Corrections (DOC) has obtained estimates for design, demolition, and construction, with an estimated budget of $6.5 to $8 million. The DOC is working with the Bureau of Real Estate (BREM) to develop a request for qualifications for an architectural design, setting up the first step in a design-bid-build approach to reopening DCF.

An earlier proposal aimed to open a facility elsewhere in the county.

RELATED: Department of Corrections looks for new facility
RELATED: Washington County prison will house 50 inmates — but where?

Construction is estimated to take about 24 months before an opening.

The DOC is expected to engage with unions, including on the issue of extending recall rights of former employees, the governor’s office said.

Funding will come from a state government bond, approved in 2016, which also funds a remodel of Windham’s Maine Correctional Center.

Mills said she was proud her administration was able to work closely with state Sen. Marianne Moore, R-Washington; and Reps. Tuell; Rep. Kathy Javner, R-Chester; Rep. Billy Bob Faulkingham, R-Winter Harbor; and Rep. Robert Alley, D-Beals.

“As someone who fought to keep DCF open, I understand how important it is to the people of Washington County and I shared in their frustration when it was closed,” Mills said in a statement. “I thank the Washington County Delegation for working with me and Commissioner Liberty to rectify this situation as best we could and ensure that DCF continues on in this new facility.”

RELATED: Corrections facility may return to Washington County
RELATED: Downeast Corrections gets support from new budget

Tuell thanked the governor and her administration.

“We are very happy the Administration is keeping DCF where it is and keeping a promise to the people of Washington County,” he said. “Our delegation was committed to the current DCF location, and we are very pleased with the outcome.”

Sen. Moore was relieved an agreement had been made.

“I am happy to have been able to work with [Mills] and my fellow Washington County delegation to finally put to rest the issue of Downeast Correctional Facility so the local community can finally move forward with a resolution,” Moore said. “While the new facility won’t be to the scale of what DCF once was, it will once again provide an important service to our state and economy.”

DOC Commissioner Randall A. Liberty said it felt good to common ground with former DCF employees and lawmakers. “This new facility will keep alive the deeply rooted correctional tradition of the region,” he said.

I am doing well.

Finished two college courses. and started four more last January.  I’ve got a paying job with the youth center group.  Things are moving in the right direction.

Praise be to God!

I’d like to hear from any of you as soon as ever.

As I am,

Prince

danny2

Write to Prince via:

Maine State Prison – Daniel Fortune – MDOC #86753

807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

Joshua Dall-Leighton is accused of sexually assaulting a female inmate in his charge at the Southern Maine Reentry Center in Alfred.

Joshua Dall-Leighton of Standish, who made headlines in 2015 when he donated a kidney to a woman who was looking for a donor, denies accusations that he had sexual encounters with a female inmate he supervised. 2015 Press Herald fileJoshua Dall-Leighton of Standish, who made headlines in 2015 when he donated a kidney to a woman who was looking for a donor, denies accusations that he had sexual encounters with a female inmate he supervised. 

A trial begins Monday for a former prison guard accused of repeatedly sexually assaulting a woman who was incarcerated at a transitional corrections facility in Alfred.

Joshua Dall-Leighton, 34, faces five charges of gross sexual assault and one of unlawful sexual contact. All are felonies, and he has pleaded not guilty.

Dall-Leighton received widespread media attention in June 2015 for donating a kidney to a woman who advertised her need for a new organ in the back window of her car. That gift of his kidney to a virtual stranger may play a role in his trial.

Among the motions filed in the case is a request by the state to keep that information from the jury. The defense objected, saying it was evidence of his character. It was not clear Friday how the judge had ruled on that motion and others.

The indictment states the alleged crimes took place on multiple days between December 2015 and February 2016. During that time, Dall-Leighton worked at a pre-release center for female inmates in Alfred, where the woman was finishing a prison sentence.

An affidavit filed in York County Superior Court by a Maine Department of Corrections detective describes alleged sexual encounters between the guard and the woman in a prison transport van. Dall-Leighton drove the van to take the woman to her workplace in Sanford, according to the affidavit.

The affidavit quoted a letter the woman wrote to a Bangor attorney describing the advances of an officer at the pre-release center. She said she eventually became intoxicated so she would be transferred from the Southern Maine Reentry Center in Alfred back to the Maine Correctional Facility in Windham to get away from him.

“I avoided sexual intercourse with this officer for some time but because of his position of power, and the many things I stood to lose, I felt pressured to engage,” she wrote. “This officer transported me to work several times per week and we were often alone while driving. I requested a job change, but was repeatedly denied. I felt I was in a no-win situation.”

Dall-Leighton stopped working at the pre-release center when he was charged, his defense lawyer told the Portland Press Herald at the time.

More than two years have passed since a York County grand jury indicted Dall-Leighton in November 2016. Neither the defense attorney nor the District Attorney’s Office returned a call for comment Friday.

The woman was convicted in January 2012 in Rockland of elevated aggravated assault, robbery and burglary. She was sentenced to 10 years in prison with all but six years suspended. Now 34 years old, she has been released and is on probation. The Portland Press Herald does not name the victims of alleged sex crimes without their consent.

She also filed a lawsuit in 2017 against Dall-Leighton, as well as the state and prison officials she said failed to protect her from the assaults. The former guard did not respond to the complaint, meaning he was in default. A federal judge then ordered him to pay $1.1 million to the former inmate, although it is not clear if he can or will pay that sum.

Ezra Willey, who represents the woman in the civil matter but does not have an active role in the criminal case, said he is pursuing options for his client to collect at least part of that award. The judge also dismissed the lawsuit against the state and the corrections officials, a decision Willey has appealed.

Willey credited the woman for coming forward with her allegations against Dall-Leighton and referenced the #MeToo movement that has shed light on sexual misconduct.

“She’s a recovery coach now,” he said. “She’s been speaking at different events about addiction. She’s really gotten out there in the community and is not only trying to help herself, but she’s really trying to help other people. I really admire her for that.”

The facility off of Hammond Street in downtown Bangor is structurally sound, but it’s currently over capacity, housing more than the 157 inmates it’s equipped to jail.
Penobscot County Jail and Court House Bangor, ME

BANGOR, Maine — There’s a proposal in the works to build an entirely new Penobscot County Jail.

The price tag for taxpayers? $65 million.

The facility off of Hammond Street in downtown Bangor is structurally sound, but it’s currently over capacity, housing more than the 157 inmates it’s equipped to jail.

Penobscot County Commissioner Peter Baldacci said, on average, the jail houses 190 inmates.

“It’s overcrowded and its been overcrowded for at least five or six years,” said Baldacci.

Even more inmates facing charges in Penobscot County are being shipped to neighboring counties to be jailed, at a price of $800,000 a year.

“The cost of incarceration is significant,” added Baldacci.

The proposed solution is to build a jail for 300 inmates and allow for enough room to house all of the inmates under one roof.

This new, freestanding jail would be built behind the current jail.

“It’s too costly to build a 300 bed all-standing jail and walk away from our investment in the current jail,” said Baldacci.

An alternative proposal to building an entirely new jail facility is to build an addition to the current facility with 150 beds.

State Representative Steve Stanley said he can get on board with the addition to the current jail.

“That will help them with the problem that they have and with their future needs down the road,” said Stanley.

Officials with knowledge of both plans said this alternative would cost taxpayers $20-30 million dollars but may be equal in cost over time, given staffing and management costs.

Still, Baldacci said he’s leaning toward the proposal to build an addition because it lets taxpayers off the hook for the steep price, which would be paid out over the next 30 years.

Stanley said the issue of overcrowding isn’t a new one for the Penobscot County Jail, and he and his colleagues are partially to blame.

“They’ve seen it coming for years,” said Stanley. “We as a legislature are making a lot more laws that are putting people in jail.”

Stanley said building an entirely new facility on the taxpayers’ dime isn’t the solution though.

“The solution for the $60-70 million dollar jail is a little bit far-fetched because you’re talking a $4 million dollar increase in the county budget,” said Stanley.

Penobscot County would quickly go from having no debt to decades of debt with the proposal to build a new jail.

“It comes out of the taxpayers’ pocket,” added Stanley.

“I do have concerns about 30 years of debt,” said Baldacci.

Penobscot County Sheriff Troy Morton released a statement to NEWS CENTER Maine in which he said he does “support the building of a new correctional facility.”

The statement went on to say, in part, “the inmates incarcerated today often pose many challenges. Mental health, substance abuse, violence, and medical issues are real challenges and impact housing. […] While some changes in mental health and substance abuse may occur, there are still many laws being enacted and increased class of crimes implemented. The requirements being placed on correctional facilities require space to accomplish them.”

Baldacci said the county commissioners will need to make a decision as to which direction they’ll take on the issue next month if the proposal is to be put on the ballot in November as a bond issue.

It remains to be seen which solution, if any, the taxpayers in Penobscot County will support.

“When people are putting a bond issue for schools, for example, there’s a natural constituency that’s going to support better and more modern schools,” said Baldacci. “There’s not a natural constituency for a more modern jail. There are people who work to provide services in the jail who want to see us do something significant and have better facilities.”

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Political Prisoners

Welcome to the blog from inmates of Maine's jails and prisons.

In collaboration with the Holistic Recovery Project, the Political Prisoners Blog provides a prisoner's view into what's happening at Maine's correctional facilities.

Only your vigilance on the outside can guarrentee that justice goes on on the inside.

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