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University of New England students have created a program for jail staff and correction officers to help them deal with stress and other wellness issues
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PORTLAND, Maine — Students at the University of New England are spending time at the Cumberland County Jail this week.

The students have created a program for jail staff and correction officers to help them deal with several issues. The biggest one…stress.

They’re doing it not only for class credit, but because they say it’s the right the thing to do.

All week UNE students, studying to be nurses, occupational therapists and trainers, will help the staff with nutrition, exercise and stress management.

In the stress management session there were all kind of sensory activities like making slime and stress balls, by stuffing flour into a balloon.

It’s a  tool that will come in handy for corrections officer Chelsea Moore.

“There’s a lot of stress looking over your shoulder. There’s a lot of not knowing what’s going to happen at any given second. That’s probably the most tiring part of it” Moore says.

This is not the first time UNE students have been in the jail. They were there last year working with inmates, helping them with all kinds of wellness issues.

While there, they noticed the jail staff and correction officers could use some of the same services.

Kelly Pitre, who is studying occupational therapy at UNE, and will graduate next month, is spearheading this program, which is all volunteer.

“I feel like it’s our turn to take care of them” Pitre says. “I’m passionate about it, it’s a great way to put my skills to the test and help implement stress, well being, health and wellness.”

Libby Alvin, who is set to graduate from UNE’s nursing program next month says while she is busy with her school work, she looks forward to getting out in the community.

“It brings you back to why you’re doing school and why you’re working your butt off everyday in the library, to work with people and help make things better.”

A kind gesture that’s greatly appreciated.

“It’s nice to know somebody thought of us. There’s all this work, put into a whole week of them coming in and spending time with all shifts” says Moore.

Last year Cumberland County Sheriff Kevin Joyce awarded UNE students a Volunteer Appreciation Award for their work with inmates.

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If you have…..

INTEGRITY  COURAGE  COMMITMENT

Let’s talk!!  The Department of Corrections is currently seeking applicants for Correctional Officers.  View a list of our current openings below or call (207) 287-4498 to find out how to join our team and begin an exciting career in Corrections!

Watch the video below to see what the job is all about and to find out what we’re looking for in applicants.  Do you have what it takes?

https://player.vimeo.com/video/82035562

Correctional Officers have many opportunities for career diversity and advancement.

Click here for more information.

If you are interested in a challenging career in the Maine Department of Corrections, the following positions are now open for recruitment.The links below will give you the job postings and information on how to apply.

Click here for medical, mental health and substance abuse opportunities

Paperwork to get the process started

Direct Hire Career Opportunities

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Correctional Trade Shop Supervisor

Job Class Code:  Grade: 18 Salary: $18.38-23.30Open: February 15, 2019Close: March 15, 2019

Location: Warren, Maine 04864

Job Category: *Open Competitive

Position Type: Full Time

Correctional Officer, Maine State Prison

Close: Once Filled

Location: Warren, Maine 04864

Job Category: Correctional Services

Position Type: Full Time

Correctional Plant Maintenance Engineer I

Close: Once Filled

Location: Warren, Maine 04864

Job Category: Engineering

Position Type: Full Time

Correctional Electrician II

Close: Once Filled

Location: Warren, Maine 04864

Job Category: Electrician

Position Type: Full Time

Correctional Officer Cook – Maine State Prison

Close: Once Filled

Location: Warren, Maine 04864

Job Category: Correctional Services

Position Type: Full Time

Correctional Officer Cook – Maine Correctional Center

Close: Once Filled

Location: Windham, Maine 04062

Job Category: Correctional Services

Position Type: Full Time

Corrections Officer, Maine Correctional Center

Close: Once Filled

Location: Windham, Maine 04062

Job Category: Correctional Services

Position Type: Full Time

Deputy Warden – Programs and Services

Close: March 1, 2019

Location: Warren, Maine 04864

Job Category: Correctional Services

Position Type: Full Time

Director of Security

Close: March 13, 2019

Location: Charleston, Maine 04422

Job Category: Correctional Services

Position Type: Full Time

Financial Analyst (PSC 1) Confidential

Close: Once Filled

Location: TBD, null null

Job Category: Accounting/Finance

Position Type: Part Time

Juvenile Program Worker, Long Creek Youth Development Center

Close: Once Filled

Location: South Portland, Maine 04106

Job Category: Correctional Services

Position Type: Full Time

Office Specialist I (2 Positions available)

Close: March 15 2019

Location: Windham, Maine 04062

Job Category: Administrative

Position Type: Full Time

Becoming a Correctional Officer

The Maine Department of Corrections is recruiting for tomorrow’s Correctional Leaders!  We are looking for ethical, dependable, career-oriented men and women.  We provide interesting, hands-on training to provide you with the skills and abilities you need to do your job effectively and ensure your professional success.  Correctional Officers attend a six-week training academy covering all aspects of correctional work.  Correctional Officers receive continuous reinforcement, which highlights the Department of Corrections’ Core Values – INTEGRITY, COURAGE, and COMMITMENT.

Benefits as a Correctional Officer

A career as a Correctional Officer offers competitive pay and benefits that include:

Requirements

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

Age:  Applicants must be at least 18 years of age prior to date of hire.

Education:  Applicants must be a high school graduate or hold an equivalency certificate (GED).

Conduct:  Applicants must have no serious criminal or extensive motor vehicle records.  See Automatic Disqualifiers for details.

Physical:  Applicants must be in adequate physical condition to perform the duties of a Correctional Officer. A valid, State of Maine Driver’s License is required upon employment.

Hiring Process

  1. APPLICATION EVALUATION: Applications are reviewed to verify that each candidate meets the established Minimum Qualifications/Requirements. Applicants who do not meet these requirements are disqualified from further consideration.
  2. PHYSICAL AGILITY TEST (PAT):  Standards for successful completion of the PAT are available upon request.
  3. ORAL BOARD INTERVIEW: Applicants successfully meeting the Minimum Requirements and who have passed PAT will be scheduled for an Oral Board Interview. The Oral Board is a structured interview that evaluates applicants’ skills in the areas of Commitment & Independence; Judgment & Logic; Decision Making Decisiveness; Tact & Diplomacy; and Communication Skills. The Oral Board is a pass/fail component of the applicant process.
  4. BACKGROUND INVESTIGATION:  Applicants who successfully pass the Oral Board Interview will have a finger-print based criminal history record check along with a prior employment reference check.
  5. ALERT TEST: Applicants must pass the ALERT test prior to being hired as a Correctional Officer.  The Alert Test will be set up upon completion of all previous steps. This test must meet the Maine Criminal Justice Academy’s minimum passing score for entrance into basic corrections training. Test questions are multiple choice and fall within the categories of Writing Skills and Reading Comprehension.

You should be aware before starting the application process that the following are disqualifiers for this position.

If you:

  1. Have been convicted of murder or any crime classified in Maine law as a Class A, Class B, or Class C crime (i.e., any crime with a maximum term of imprisonment of one year or more), or of any substantially similar crime in another jurisdiction outside the State of Maine;
  2. Have been convicted of any crime classified in Maine law as a Class D crime (i.e., any crime with a maximum possible term of imprisonment of less than one year), or of any substantially similar crime in another jurisdiction outside the State of Maine;
  3. Have been convicted of any of the following provisions of the Maine Criminal Code (Title 17-A of the Maine Revised Statutes Annotated), or of any substantially similar crime in another jurisdiction outside the State of Maine;
    1. Theft, including, but not limited to: Theft by deception; Insurance deception; Theft by extortion; Theft of lost, mislaid or mistakenly delivered property; Theft of services; Theft by misapplication of property; Unauthorized use of property;
    2. Chapter 19, Falsification in Official Matters, including, but not limited to:  Perjury; False swearing; Unsworn falsification; Tampering with a witness, informant, juror, or victim; Falsifying physical evidence; Tampering with public records or information; Impersonating a public servant;
    3. Bribery and Corrupt Practices, including, but not limited to: Bribery in official and political matters; Improper influence; Improper compensation for past action; Improper gifts to public servants; Improper compensation for services; Purchase of public office; Official oppression; Misuse of information; or
    4. Chapter 45, Drugs, including, but not limited to: Unlawful or Aggravated trafficking in scheduled drugs; Unlawfully furnishing scheduled drugs; Unlawful possession of scheduled drugs; Acquiring drugs by deception; Stealing drugs; Cultivating marijuana; Illegal importation of scheduled drugs; Unlawful possession, unlawful trafficking, or unlawful furnishing of synthetic hallucinogenic drugs;
  4. Have engaged in any conduct described in paragraphs 1, 2, and/or 3, above;
  5. Have been convicted of any crime that is a violation of any domestic abuse law of any State or Federal jurisdiction;
  6. Have been convicted of operating under the influence (O.U.I.) of intoxicating liquor and/or drugs within the ten (10) years preceding the date of your application;
  7. Are currently abusing drugs or alcohol; or
  8. Falsify or misrepresent a material fact by signing this document, or when you are/were interviewed during the background investigation phase of the application process.

HOW TO APPLY:

We require the State of Maine Direct Hire Application and the DOC Supplemental Application.  Submit both to:

Department of Corrections Service Center
Attn: Clint Peebles, HR Recruiter
doc.jobs@maine.gov or fax to (207)287-4310

Or mail to:

Department of Corrections Service Center
Attn: Clint Peebles, HR Recruiter
25 Tyson Drive
SHS 111
Augusta, ME  04333-0111

In the list of Direct Hire Career Opportunities above, click on the YES in the “Supplemental Required” column.  Direct Hire Application Forms may also be obtained from the State Bureau of Human Resources, a local branch of the Maine Career Center, or any of our facilities.

For More Information – Thank you for considering a career with the Maine Department of Corrections.  For more information about the hiring process or about employment opportunities, please contact Clint Peebles at doc.jobs@maine.gov or (207)287-4498.

For all other Human Resources inquiries, please contact the Human Resource Business Partner below.

Mountain View Correctional Facility / Downeast Correctional Facility, Contact: Darlene Sage
Long Creek Youth Development Center, Contact Charlene Gamage
Maine Correctional Center/Southern Maine Reentry Center, Contact: Michelle Senence
Maine State Prison / Bolduc Correctional Facility, Contact: Jeanne Fales
Adult Community Corrections/Juvenile Community Corrections, Contact: Rhonda Hutchinson-Peaslee

Maine Department of Corrections, Come for the Job….Stay for the Challenge!

The Maine Department of Corrections is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.  Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.  We provide reasonable accommodations to qualified individuals with disabilities upon request.

 

Image result for Criminal Justice Academy in VassalboroVassalboro,  Maine — A sheriff in Maine says two corrections officers have been placed on paid leave after a fellow officer was shot in an apparent accident at a police training academy.

Matthew Morrison of the Aroostook County Sheriff’s Department was shot in the leg in a parking lot at the Criminal Justice Academy in Vassalboro on Monday. He was taken by ambulance to MaineGeneral in Augusta and then flown by the Lifeflight helicopter to Maine Medical, according to CBS affiliate WAGM-TV,  and is recovering.

Police say 24-year-old Cumberland County corrections officer Matthew Begner shot Morrison. Police say the shooting took place inside a pickup truck owned by by another Cumberland County officer, 25-year-old Cody Gillis, of Brunswick.

 

Police say the 9mm gun is owned by Gillis.

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The shooting took place as the three men were leaving the academy grounds for the evening around 8 p.m. The gun had been stored in the console of Gillis’ truck.

The director of the academy says he will also review the shooting and is awaiting the final investigative report from Maine State Police. WGME-TV reports ( http://bit.ly/2sy9dWR ) that the academy director says corrections officers aren’t supposed to have guns on campus.

The Kennebec County District Attorney’s Office will also receive a copy of that report, the station reports.

State police and the Cumberland County sheriff are both investigating.

 

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24 January 2019

Jay-Z and Meek Mill launch Reform AllianceJay-Z and Meek Mill have partnered with the owners of the New England Patriots and Philadelphia 76ers, among others, to launch the Reform Alliance

Jay-Z, Meek Mill and sport and business leaders have pledged $50m (£38m) to reform the US criminal justice system.

The Reform Alliance, which was inspired by Meek Mill’s recent stint in prison for a minor probation violation, hopes to free one million prisoners in five years.

The owners of the New England Patriots and Philadelphia 76ers, Robert Kraft and Michael Rubin, are co-founders.

Reform says it wants to help people who are “trapped in the system”.

The group’s “mission” is to “dramatically reduce the number of people who are unjustly under the control of the criminal justice system, starting with probation and parole”.

“To win, we will leverage our considerable resources to change laws, policies, hearts and minds,” it says.

More than six million people can currently count themselves as part of the “correctional population” of the USA – which includes people in prisons and local jails, but is mostly made up of the more than four million people on probation or parole, according to Bureau of Justice statistics.

Probation is often given as a sentence instead of time in prison and can include conditions like being on a curfew or going to rehab.

Parole is when an inmate is released early from prison with similar conditions to probation.

Meek Mill has experienced all three: probation, parole and jail.

The Reform Alliance says his case is an example of the “devastating and long-lasting effects” that can occur after one interaction with the criminal justice system.

The rapper was arrested in 2007 – he says wrongfully – for drug and gun charges, aged 19.

He was sentenced in 2009 to between 11 and 23 months in county prison, but was released on parole after five months and put on house arrest.

It was during this time he started to make his name nationally as a rapper, signing to Rick Ross’s label and releasing a string of hugely successful mixtapes.

Before long he was a platinum-selling artist.

But a parole violation for suspected cannabis use resulted in a ban on touring, and then after failing to get his travel plans approved by the court Meek was sentenced to prison again in 2014.

Examples of parole violations that can land people back in prison range from being late to appointments with parole officers or missing a curfew, to things more specific to the crime that was committed – like failing to attend an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting.

“When you talk about these so-called technical violations, it’s not technical to the kid who can never see her mum again because she showed up late for a meeting. That’s not technical, that’s devastating for that individual child,” Reform Alliance CEO Van Jones said.

Violations over the next few years resulted in his probation period being extended – it now lasts up until 2023 – as well as the five months in prison which ended in April 2018 and birthed the #FreeMeek movement.

It’s people with a similar story to Meek’s, that have been “caught up on probation and parole”, that Reform says it wants to focus on first.

‘If someone commits a crime they should go to jail’

“Being from the environment I’m from, I don’t even think it’s possible for you to be an angel,” Meek said as the organisation was announced in New York.

“You grow up around murder on a daily basis, you grow up in drug-infested neighbourhoods.

“And every time I started to further my life with the music industry, there was always something that brought me back to ground zero,” he said.

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf, who attended the event, said he was a supporter of criminal justice reforms that are “fair, help our system work better and smarter, and save crucial taxpayer dollars while balancing public safety and victim concerns”.

Across the US, roughly a third of people on parole are black, according to Bureau of Justice statistics – something Jay-Z raised at the event.

“We want to be very clear. If someone commits a crime they should go to jail. But these things are just disproportionate and the whole world knows it,” he said.

Jay-Z has been vocal about Meek’s case, writing in the New York Times while he was imprisoned.

“On the surface, this may look like the story of yet another criminal rapper who didn’t smarten up and is back where he started,” he wrote.

“What’s happening to Meek Mill is just one example of how our criminal justice system entraps and harasses hundreds of thousands of black people every day.

“I saw this up close when I was growing up in Brooklyn during the 1970s and 1980s. Instead of a second chance, probation ends up being a land mine, with a random misstep bringing consequences greater than the crime. A person on probation can end up in jail over a technical violation like missing a curfew.”

 

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“You just sell it like you were selling cars, or real estate, or hamburgers.

In the early 1980s, the Corrections Corporation of America pioneered the idea of running prisons for a profit. “You just sell it like you were selling cars, or real estate, or hamburgers,” one of its founders told Inc. magazine. Today, corporate-run prisons hold eight percent of America’s inmates. Here’s how the private prison industry took off:

1983

Thomas Beasley, Doctor R. Crants, and T. Don Hutto start Corrections Corporation of America, the world’s first private prison company.

1984
CCA begins operating a county jail and a juvenile detention center in Tennessee. It also opens its first privately owned facility in Houston, a motel hastily remodeled to hold immigration detainees.

1985
A federal judge orders Tennessee to stop admitting inmates to its overcrowded prisons. CCA offers, unsuccessfully, to pay $250 million for a 99-year lease on the state’s entire prison system.

1986
CCA goes public, saying its facility design and use of electronic surveillance mean it can operate larger prisons “with less staff than the public sector would have needed.”

Dog team at Winn Correctional Center

A guard dog at Winn Correctional Center in Winnfield, Louisiana
1987
Wackenhut Corrections Corporation, later known as the GEO Group, gets its first contract to run a federal immigration detention center.

1990s
Among the “model” bills ?to emerge from the American Legislative Exchange Council‘s criminal justice task force, which CCA later co-chairs, are truth-in-sentencing and three-strikes legislation that help fuel the ’90s prison boom. (CCA says it did not vote on or comment on any proposed ALEC legislation.)*

1997
Arguing that it’s in the property business, CCA becomes a real estate investment trust for tax purposes. A new affiliate, Prison Realty Trust, raises $447 million for a prison-buying spree.

Private And Public Prison Populations 1990-2014

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1998
The Justice Department investigates a CCA prison in Youngstown, Ohio, following a spate of escapes, stabbings, and killings. In addition to finding inexperienced and poorly trained guards, the probe reveals that CCA took on maximum-security inmates at a facility designed for a medium-security population.

2000
As prison occupancy rates drop, Prison Realty Trust nearly goes bankrupt. CCA stock, once nearly $150 a share, falls to 19 cents. The company drops the trust and restructures.

CCA Stock Price, 1997-2016

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2004
A Justice Department report finds a “disturbing degree” of physical abuse by staff and underreporting of violence among inmates at a Baltimore juvenile facility run by the private prison operator Correctional Services Corporation. CSC is later acquired by GEO.

2005
Rep. Ted Strickland (D-Ohio) introduces the Private Prison Information Act, which would require private prisons holding federal inmates to comply with Freedom of Information Act requests. It died, as have at least seven similar bills opposed by CCA and GEO.

2007

A drawing by an immigrant child held at CCA's T. Don Hutto Center.

A drawing by an immigrant child held at CCA’s T. Don Hutto Center. ACLU

CCA’s and GEO’s stock prices jump as both companies jockey to run the federal government’s expanding immigration detention centers. Meanwhile, the ACLU settles a case against Immigration and Customs Enforcement for conditions in the CCA-managed T. Don Hutto Residential Center in Texas, where about half the detainees are kids. Under the agreement, children no longer wear prison uniforms and may move more freely.

2008
The New York Times investigates the deaths of immigration detainees, such as a Guinean man at a CCA-run facility who fractured his skull and was placed in solitary confinement before being taken to a hospital. He died after four months in a coma.

2009
A CCA representative attends a meeting where ALEC members draft the legislation that will eventually become Arizona’s notorious anti-immigration law. CCA denies having a hand in writing the bill. It cuts ties with ALEC the following year.

2010
An ACLU suit alleges rampant violence at a CCA-run Idaho prison known as “gladiator school.” The lawsuit claims the prison is understaffed and fosters an environment that “relies on the degradation, humiliation, and subjugation of prisoners.” The FBI investigates but doesn’t pursue charges. In Kentucky, the governor orders all female inmates removed from a CCA prison after more than a dozen cases of alleged sexual abuse by guards.

2011
 

Inmates at Winn Correctional Center

Inmates at Winn Correctional Center

CCA becomes the first private prison company to purchase a state facility, buying Ohio’s Lake Erie Correctional Institutionas part of a privatization plan proposed by Gov. John Kasich and supported by his corrections chief, former CCA Director Gary Mohr.

 

2012
CCA offers to buy prisons in 48 states in exchange for 20-year management contracts. The same year, a GEO-operated youth facility in Mississippi where staff sexually abused minors is described by a judge as a “cesspool of unconstitutional and inhuman acts and conditions.” At another Mississippi facility, a 24-year-old CCA employee is killed during a riot over prisoners’ complaints about poor food, inadequate medical care, and disrespectful guards.

2013
CCA converts back to a real estate investment trust, as does GEO. Mother Jones reports that the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has invested $2.2 million in GEO.

2014
As it did during at least the previous five years, CCA’s annual report flags criminal justice reform—including drug decriminalization and the reduction of mandatory minimum sentences—as a “risk factor” for its business.* Chris Epps, Mississippi’s prison commissioner and the president of the American Correctional Association, is charged with taking kickbacks from a private prison contractor.

2015
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) co-sponsors the Justice is Not for Sale Act, which would ban all government contracts with private prison companies. After Hillary Clinton is criticizedfor using campaign bundlers who’d worked as lobbyists for CCA and GEO, she promises to no longer take their money and says, “We should end private prisons and private detention centers.”

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* This item has been clarified.

Misty Romero of Limington faces several charges after police say she drove through a closed accident scene, nearly hit a Gorham police office and struck six vehicles,

The Cumberland County Sheriff’s office said in a press release that Misty Romero was charged with eluding an officer and operating under the influence following the 6:40 p.m. incident that started on Route 35 in Standish. Police said a motorist had called the county dispatch center to report the 2012 Dodge Ram 2500 truck was operating erratically. The truck stopped near Route 35 and Route 237 in Standish where traffic had backed up due to a motorcycle fire on the side of Route 35. A Gorham police officer had a brief contact with Romero before she sped off nearly striking the officer. The truck drove through the backed up traffic, striking six other vehicles including two Standish fire vehicles and losing the truck’s driver’s side tire. Deputies were able to catch up with the truck which continued to operate with three tires, sending out a large trail of sparks s. The truck traveled at 40 to 85 mph for more than three miles before it became disabled. Romero and a 40-year-old passenger were taken into custody.

The passenger was not charged. Romero was ordered held for eight hours before she could pay the $1,500 bail.

Romero was also arrested on several other charges, police said.

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4,900 people from Maine are behind bars today – Prisonpolicy.org

Pie chart showing that 3,800 Maine residents are locked up in federal prisons, state prisons, local jails and other types of facilities

Rates of imprisonment have grown dramatically in the last 40 years

graph showing the number of people in state prison and local jails per 100,000 residents in Maine from 1978 to 2015Also see these Maine graphs:

Graph showing the number of people in Maine jails who were convicted and the number who were unconvicted, for the years 1978, 1983, 1988, 1993, 1999, 2005, and 2013.

Today, Maine’s incarceration rates stand out internationally

graphic comparing the incarceration rates of the founding NATO members with the incarceration rates of the United States and the state of Maine. The incarceration rate of 698 per 100,000 for the United States and 363 for Maine is much higher than any of the founding NATO membersIn the U.S., incarceration extends beyond prisons and local jails to include other systems of confinement. The U.S. and state incarceration rates in this graph include people held by these other parts of the justice system, so they may be slightly higher than the commonly reported incarceration rates that only include prisons and jails. Details on the data are available in States of Incarceration: The Global Context. We also have a version of this graph focusing on the incarceration of women.

People of color are overrepresented in prisons and jails

2010 graph showing incarceration rates per 100,000 people of various racial and ethnic groups in Maine

racial and ethnic disparities between the prison/jail and general population in ME as of 2010See also our detailed graphs about WhitesBlacks, and American Indians/Native Americans in Maine prisons and jails.

Maine’s criminal justice system is more than just its prisons and jails

Pie chart showing that 10,000 Maine residents are in various types of correctional facilities or under criminal justice supervision on probation or parole

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Welcome to the blog from inmates of Maine's jails and prisons.

In collaboration with the Holistic Recovery Project, the Political Prisoners Blog provides a prisoner's view into what's happening at Maine's correctional facilities.

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