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For all who don’t know me I am Pastor Dudley right now  I am working in pat with Maple Tree Ministries on Christ Mission Prison Outreach Project

So far what we have been able to do is pass out books and bibles we also pass out the prisoners free list which gives people opinions for different things that they can have sent free of charge to help them grow in Christ.

I have also done my best on helping inmates who have no support on the outside of the prison when it comes down to getting stamps and hygene items for what I have come to find is that when you are an inmate you need to hope you get money from the outside world.

It has been a blessing for so many inmates here in the B.O.P. I pray for Gods help to come up with more funds for as of a few months ago Christ Mission has run out of funds for the copys we make of the free list, supplies to type out the four news letters we write a year.

I keep doing gods work none the less by working with inmates spreading Gods word. I ask for your prayers and help with funding for Christ Mission even  $2.50 a day could go a long way when it is used for gods work.

Thank you for your prays

Pastor Dudley

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Circle,

How are you guys?  I did get your letter today; I guess you could say I am great for now.  I will write you a news letter soon, plus another blog entry for you guys (I guess you could say this one’s just ho hum.)  Sorry.  Had a lot going on around here.

As I told Dark Star in my letter to her, if I had a number I could call her, but, I guess if she really wants nothing to do with me then whatever, I just lost a lot of friends.  I just thought she was at least a little different.

I did try to call you guys a few times today.  As you know if takes alot to get stamps for anything, unless you guys have money.  So I will send you this letter, but I will finish my newsletter-blog and see what I can about getting it copied and sent out.

I still don’t know yet if I can see or even speak to my kids yet.  I should know after tomorrow, for if all works out I should be on the phone for court at 3 pm.

Lori still does not send me pictures and mom has to fix her printer first before she can.  I guess you could say same old same old, right?

I guess you could say any pictures of Dark Star, Arline, my kids,  or anything else you want to send.

I’ll write again real soon.

Father Dudley

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Incarceration in the United States is the main form of punishment for the commission of a crime. The United States has the largest prison population in the world, and the second-highest per-capita incarceration rate, behind Seychelles (a tiny island country off the coast of East Africa, which in 2014 had a total prison population of 735 out of a population of around 92,000). 

In 2013 in the US, there were 698 adults incarcerated per 100,000 population, with (According to the US Bureau of Justice Statistics ) 2,220,300 adults incarcerated in US federal and state prisons, and county jails.  That’s one out of every 110 citizens of the United States, or  about 0.91% of our adult population.  That’s not counting the 4,751,400 adults in 2013 (1 in 51) on probation or on parole!  In total, 6,899,000 adults were under correctional supervision (probation, parole, jail, or prison) in 2013 – about 2.8% of the adults (1 in 35) in the U.S. 

Oh, almost forgot: there were also 54,148 juveniles in jail (“juvenile detention”) in 2013.

According to a 2014 Human Rights Watch report, “tough-on-crime” laws adopted since the 1980s, most especially Bill Clinton’s Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 (the largest crime bill in the history of the United States and consisted of 356 pages that provided for 100,000 new police officers, $9.7 billion in funding for prisons and $6.1 billion in funding for prevention programs, which were designed with significant input from experienced police officers) have filled U.S. prisons with mostly nonviolent offenders. This insane policy has completely failed to rehabilitate prisoners and many are worse on release than before incarceration.

Rehabilitation programs for offenders can be more cost effective than prison.  According to a 2016 analysis of federal data by the U.S. Education Department, state and local spending on incarceration has grown three times as much as spending on public education since 1980.

Why? Watch the Netflix documentary “13.”

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The Maine Department of Corrections has intercepted more Suboxone sublingual film — thin strips of a prescription drug that are easy to hide and can be dissolved on the tongue — than any other contraband smuggled into Maine jails.

Research by Portland-based CBS affiliate WGME’s investigative reporter Marissa Bodnar found that inmates are regularly trying to sneak in and abuse the drug, which can be prescribed as a treatment for opioid addiction.

Cumberland County Sheriff Kevin Joyce told WGME Suboxone strips have been found in between sheets of cardboard and in the folds of envelopes. Attempts to smuggle in drugs also have prompted the jail to limit contact between inmates and visitors, leaving inmates to see loved ones from behind a sheet of glass.

“We’ve banned cards from coming in,” Joyce said. “We take photocopies of greeting cards.”

Suboxone is a branded prescription drug that includes the active ingredients buprenorphine and naloxone.

Addiction treatment specialists have said Suboxone can be an effective medication to help those battling addiction to heroin and other opiates and opioids, if used correctly.

Dr. Mark Publicker, a longtime Maine addiction specialist, told WGME that inmates should have regular access to medication and therapy.

“Any of the [federally] approved medications should be used,” he said. “We need to develop systems [to create better access to addiction treatment for inmates] and understand, right now at any given time, the figure is over 80,000 prisoners in state and federal levels have opiate addiction and are not being treated.”

Bodnar found that, in addition to the Suboxone strips, heroin, marijuana, methadone, Oxycodone and tobacco, among other contraband items, have been confiscated by corrections officials in Maine jails.

Lethal Dose Haiku

Body camera video produced Wednesday appears to show a Baltimore police officer plant drugs in late January, an act that later resulted in a criminal arrest.

The 90-second Baltimore police body camera video, which was made public by the Maryland Office of the Public Defender, belongs to Officer Richard Pinheiro, who appears to hide and later “find” drugs among trash strewn on a plot next to a Baltimore residence. Two other officers appear to be with the Pinheiro as he hides the drugs.

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 Body Camera Shows Baltimore Police Officer Allegedly Planting Evidence 1:53

“I’m gonna go check here,” Pinheiro announces in the video from a morning in late January. He then picks up a can in which he placed a plastic bag of pills earlier in the video and retrieves them.

“This is a serious allegation of police misconduct,” Baltimore Police Commissioner Kevin Davis said. “There is nothing that deteriorates the trust of any community more than thinking for one second that police officers … would plant evidence of crimes on citizens.”

One of the officers has been suspended, and two others have been placed on “nonpublic contact” administrative duty, Davis told reporters.

Police said the Office of Professional Responsibility Ethics Section was investigating.

Pinheiro is a witness in about 53 active cases, and he was even called to testify in a case earlier this week, the Public Defender’s Office said.

The new video has led to that case’s dismissal after an assistant public defender forwarded it to the Baltimore City State’s Attorney’s Office, according to the Public Defender’s Office.

Melba Saunders, a spokeswoman for the Baltimore City State’s Attorney’s Office, said the prosecutor took “immediate and appropriate actions” and dropped the case against the man who was charged.

“Currently, this case is under investigation and has been referred to internal affairs of the Baltimore Police Department,” she added.

Debbie Katz Levi, head of the Baltimore Public Defender’s Special Litigation Section, said that Baltimore police have long had a problem with officer misconduct but that the city does not hold individuals accountable.

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 Public Defender Says Bodycam Shows Baltimore Cop Planting Drugs 2:31

“We have long supported the use of police body cameras to help identify police misconduct, but such footage is meaningless if prosecutors continue to rely on these officers, especially if they do so without disclosing their bad acts,” Levi said.

Police played four other videos for the media on Wednesday afternoon to provide additional context.

In the first two videos, officers procure two gel capsules of heroin. The third video has officers approaching the alleged seller of the heroin and shows them arresting the man on whom they found marijuana and a gel capsule of heroin, police said.

In the fourth video, officers undertake an extensive search of a yard identified by the dealer for more drugs. Police said they recovered a plastic bag with 25 gel capsules of heroin.

Davis and Deputy Police Commissioner Jason Johnson suggested that it implied that they were re-enacting the recovery of drugs for the body camera — which is also inappropriate, Davis said.

“The release of [this body camera video] tells me and hopefully [the public] that there was a little more to this,” Davis told reporters.

Johnson and Davis told reporters that there was a four- to five-minute gap in the video.

According to police policy, officers are required to record all activities that are “investigative or enforcement in nature.”

The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, a component of the U.S. Justice Department, concluded in a 296-page report that there is not enough research to understand the impact of body cameras but that “the ultimate purpose of these cameras should be to help officers protect and serve the people in their communities.”

Davis said the department would get to the bottom of the matter because he fears the effect it would have on the community.

“Perception is reality,” Davis said. “If our community thinks that there are officers planting evidence in the course of their duty, that is something that will keep me up at night.”

Circle,

How are you?  I guess you could say I am okay, but I want  you guys to know you are a really hard bunch to get a hold of on the phone.

I got your letter on Thursday, plus the ones from Arline (Lawless) but no, I never got one from Robyn (aka Snax), but I guess you could say that is Kool (LOL.)

Yes, my ministry is going good, but of course it is still hard when you are broke.  As you know, now, Lori and I don’t speak so I don’t have help when it comes to money.  Why do you think it is hard to get stamps and other stuff?  Well, the Lord will provide; He always does, you know.

I guess I should tell you guys that the Feds are not like State.  You don’t get free anything.  You are on the hook for it all here, so yes, I spend the $5.00 I get a month from my job here on hygiene and a few dollars on the phone for my mom, and if I can, my kids, for Lori is doing her best to keep them from me.

But, yes, I do try to call  you guys, for yes, it would be great to hear a voice from a friend or two.  For you guys are my only friends on the outside.  I guess you could say that D.S. is also a friend, but as you know, I don’t hear from her like I hear from you.  As you know, I only heard from her once in my five years in.  If anyone hears from her, tell her that I am still waiting for her next letter.  She can’t say she is all that busy.  She can write me.

Well, I will let you folks go for now.  I hope that everyone is having a blessed summer.

your friend,

Father Dudley

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We have all of our friends suffering in corrections to trace their hands for us, the symbol of the Project.  If this is you, let us know!  Be well!

Hey, Circle.
I guess you could say I’ve been spending alot of time meditating on the words of Christ lately. I’ve notice that most preachers always quote Saint Paul, and I’ve done the same. But, I thought that it would be best to forget about Paul for a while, and return to the source.
I guess you could say I started off trying to find out what Jesus thought about homosexuality. I mean, most so called Christians seem to believe that Jesus hated homosexuals and that they’re all going to Hell. I learned that this wasn’t true.
Paul had his issues with women and slaves and homosexuals, but not Jesus. Jesus himself says nothing about homosexuality, so I guess you could say that it wasn’t a big button issue for him. He doesn’t say anything about abortion either, so I guess you could say that it wasn’t really big on his mind either.
Jesus had a problem with two groups of people: the rich, and people who fuck with children, and even then he’s all about love. “Forgive your enemies.” “Love one another.” “Love your neighbor as yourself.”
I guess you could say that you really can’t use the name of Jesus in any message of hate. No matter who you or I hate, even if we hate them because they’re bad, we can’t attach the name of Jesus to it. Jesus was about love and humility. He said that it was easy to forgive your friends, to pray for people who are good to you. He said pray for the bad ones. Forgive the bad ones. Anyone that you could name that you hate, Jesus would say, “Love them.”
I guess you could say that that’s it. Jesus doesn’t say anything bad about homosexuals. In fact Jesus doesn’t tell us to hate anyone. Jesus tells us to love one another, so, I guess you could say that if two people of the same sex love one another, then they’re doing what Jesus told us to do. I guess you could say that’s all I can think of for now. I’m going to go to bed. It’s late.
God bless us. Everyone.
God’s blessings, gifts, graces and love,
Father Dudley

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‘Father’ Dudley, 2016

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Political Prisoners

Welcome to the blog from inmates of Maine's jails and prisons.

In collaboration with the Holistic Recovery Project, the Political Prisoners Blog provides a prisoner's view into what's happening at Maine's correctional facilities.

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