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Presentation of the first edition of “Killer Advice” has been moved from Wednesday to Thursday, January 24th.  This unfortunate, but short delay is due to some technical trumps with one of our citizen collaborators.  

It’s worth the wait.

Thanks again, and sorry about the trump in the applesauce.

R.

True Believers:

A while ago we sent all of the prisoners we communicate with three requests for advice gathered from various advice columns.  We received advice back from Daniel ‘Prince’ Fortune (M.S.P./serving two life sentences for home invasion,) Michael ‘Dirty’ McQuade (M.S.P./ serving 12 years for murder,) and Arline Lawless (M.C.C./serving 35 years for murder) and we’ll post their responses this Wednesday.

Here are the requests for advice as the prisoners received them:

Problem 1: My Coworker Asked Me To Pose Topless ‘For An Anatomy Textbook’?

I work part-time in a small sales office of about 10 people. About a month ago, one of my coworkers approached me about doing a project for his graduate program at a local university. It was for some sort of anatomy textbook or similar: it would be a photo of my breasts with my face not in the photo for the textbook. I would be compensated for the photos.

There were some red flags in his proposition — the photos would be taken by him, in my home, and he never presented me with official paperwork about it. I called the university and they assured me that whatever “project” he was working on was not through their university, as there would have been extensive paperwork, screening, photos professionally taken, etc., which was what I had figured in the first place, particularly for such a large university and for a master’s program.  My question is this: Is this a matter that I should bring up to my boss? Is this something that she needs to know about?

Sincerely, A.

Problem 2. Do I Have To Tell The Daughter I Abandoned At Birth That I Trash-Talked Her Late Mom For Years?

When I was about 20, I got my girlfriend pregnant. She was 23 and wanted the baby whereas I was not ready to be a father, so she broke up with me and had the baby pretty much on her own. Her family helped her and she didn’t ask me for child support until I graduated college and had a steady job. Still, it was a burden on my entry-level salary and I resented both her and my daughter, so I wasn’t an involved father. To explain myself to my family and others who knew I had a daughter I hardly saw, I made up stories about how horrible and crazy my ex was and how it was all her fault…

My ex contacted me last year to let me know she had a terminal illness. As a new father to a year-old son, I saw I couldn’t let my 18-year-old daughter, “Lynn,” go through that alone, so I reconnected with her, made peace with my ex and have been trying to make amends.  Lynn naturally resents and distrusts me, but she is slowly becoming a part of my life. The problem is that my wife, my parents and my friends think the worst of her late mother…

Must I confess, or can I just make it up to Lynn by being the best dad I can now? The truth could really ruin our fragile relationship.

Signed “Bad Dad.”

Problem 3. Should I Tell My Friends I Think Their 5-Year-Old Son Is Going To Be A Rapist When He Grows Up?

My friends have a son, about 5 years old. They enforce little (if any) discipline on him, and he throws a hissy fit if they try to “make” him do anything. They tell him to pick up something he threw; he ignores them. Dad picks it up in a couple of minutes. They tell him to go to bed; he ignores them and keeps doing whatever he is into. My fear is that they are teaching him that he can get away with anything by ignoring the rules. Specifically, I am concerned that he will never learn that no means no, i.e., that they are raising a rapist. Should I say anything to them? If I do, it would only be once, and I wouldn’t harp on it. They are NOT people who would be okay with this outcome, and/but I don’t want to stomp on my relationship with them either.

Signed “Watching”

You’ll be completely surprised by the advice we received back, and the difference sorts of advice applied to the same problem by each inmate.  We’re going to try to get Fuzzy Bear and Sarah to give their non-prison advice, but once we’ve posted the inmate responses, we encourage you to submit your advice as well.

Or a situation that you might like to get killer advice on.

Tune in on Wednesday, and be well!

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[Image: “Killer Advice #2,” by Alyssa Joy Bartlett, 2019]

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Couple indicted in Augusta man’s murder

Zina Fritz and Michael Sean McQuade lived in apartment where killing occurred

An Augusta couple has been charged with murder in connection with the drug-related death of a man last November.

Zina Fritz, 27, and her boyfriend, Michael Sean McQuade, 45, were both indicted on murder charges stemming from the death of Joseph Marceau, 31, of Augusta, on Nov. 23, according to Steve McCausland, spokesman for the Maine Department of Public Safety spokesman.

Fritz and McQuade lived in the apartment at 75 Washington St., Augusta, where Marceau’s body was found.

Investigators have not disclosed how Marceau died but have said the death was drug-related.

Augusta police arrested the couple on unrelated charges last week. They were told of the indictment against them Monday, McCausland said.

A third person, Damik Davis of New York, was arrested on a murder charge the day Marceau’s body was discovered.

Police went to the apartment after receiving a report of a disturbance.

Fritz and McQuade are expected to make their first court appearance Tuesday at the Capital Judicial Center in Augusta.

 

Augusta couple pleads not guilty to murder, robbery

Dirty

AUGUSTA, Maine — An Augusta man and woman pleaded not guilty Tuesday to murder, felony murder and robbery in the Nov. 23 death of an Augusta man.

Zina Marie Fritze, 27, and her boyfriend, Michael Sean McQuade, 45, were indicted last week by a Kennebec County grand jury on charges of intentional or knowing or depraved indifference murder, felony murder and robbery.

Tuesday’s appearance at the Augusta Judicial Center was their first since the indictments.

Felony murder is a crime for which someone is charged when they are alleged to have caused the death of someone while committing murder, robbery, burglary, kidnapping, arson, gross sexual assault or escape.

Both will remain in jail without bail pending February hearings, Superior Court Justice Daniel Billings determined.

Another man, Damik Davis, 25, of Queens, New York, was arrested and charged with murder the day Joseph Marceau’s body was found. Davis remains in at Kennebec County Jail.

The body of Marceau of 23 Winthrop St., Augusta, was found Nov. 23, 2015, in a fourth-floor apartment rented by Fritze and McQuade at 75 State St., in Augusta.

Police have called the death a drug-related homicide, but Assistant Attorney General John Alsop, who is prosecuting the case, said following the arraignment that the felony murder charge results from the allegation of robbery and that neither Fritze nor McQuade are charged with any drug-related crimes.

Alsop said no decision has yet been made about whether to seek to join the two cases.

Immediately following Davis’ arrest, police began searching for Fritze and McQuade. They were were located, questioned and released by police two days after the homicide.

However, they were arrested by Augusta police Friday on unrelated charges and have been held in jail since then. The felony indictments were announced Monday.

Fritze’s attorney, Darrick Banda, declined to comment on the current charges, having just been assigned the case Monday. Attorney Andrew Dawson, who represents McQuade on lesser charges of theft, appeared Tuesday with McQuade, but another attorney will be appointed to represent him on the murder charges, Billings said.

Augusta murder suspect dies after being found hanging in jail cell

Zina Fritz, 27, charged with murder stemming from death of Joseph Marceau

Zina Fritz, 27, who was charged with murder stemming from the death of Joseph Marceau, 31, of Augusta, on Nov. 23, died Wednesday, said Steve McCausland, spokesman for the Maine Department of Public Safety.Fritz was found hanging by a bed sheet in her Kennebec County Jail cell Wednesday afternoon, McCausland said.

She was taken to MaineGeneral in Augusta, but died in the ambulance.

Fritz’s death will be investigated by Maine State Police and the attorney general’s officer per state protocol, McCausland said.

Fritz and her boyfriend, Michael Sean McQuade, 45, lived in the apartment at 75 Washington St., Augusta, where Marceau’s body was found.

Fritz and McQuade pleaded not guilty in court on Tuesday and were ordered held without bail.

 

Michael Sean McQuade, defendant in Augusta murder, facing burglary, theft charges

Michael Sean McQuade, 45, of Augusta, was charged Friday by a grand jury in Kennebec County with two counts of burglary, six counts of burglary of a motor vehicle, and eight counts of theft by unauthorized taking, all between May 1, 2015, and Nov. 10, 2015, and all in Augusta.

An indictment is not a determination of guilt, but it indicates that there is enough evidence to proceed with formal charges and a trial.

McQuade pleaded not guilty Jan. 26, 2016, to the prior indictment charging him with murder, felony murder and robbery, in what police say was a drug-related crime.

McQuade’s girlfriend, Zina Marie Fritze, 27, who also was indicted on the murder and robbery charges, committed suicide in jail on Jan. 27, 2016, after she too pleaded not guilty to those offenses.

Marceau was found beaten to death Nov. 23, 2015, in the Washington Street apartment that had been occupied by McQuade and Fritze. Another man, Damik Davis, 26, of Queens, New York, who was arrested shortly after Marceau’s body was found, also pleaded not guilty to murder in three separate forms — intentional or knowing or depraved indifference — as well as felony murder, murder, and robbery, all related to Marceau’s death.

Two men to be sentenced Monday in beating death of Augusta man

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Damik ‘Doughboy’ Davis and Michael ‘Dirty’ Sean McQuade both blamed a third man, Aubrey Armstrong, for the killing of Joseph Marceau.

AUGUSTA — Two more men are to be sentenced Monday in the Nov. 23, 2015, drug-related bludgeoning death of Joseph Marceau, 31, of Augusta.

The hearing is set for 1 p.m. at the Capital Judicial Center.

Damik “Doughboy” Davis, 28, of Queens, New York, and Michael “Dirty” Sean McQuade, 47, of Augusta, pleaded guilty 11 months ago to felony murder and robbery in the Augusta killing and signed agreements with the state that spelled out their sentencing parameters.

The agreements said they would cooperate with prosecution of others in the case.

A third man, Aubrey Armstrong, 29, of Far Rockaway, Queens, New York, was sentenced on July 13 to 30 years in prison for felony murder and a concurrent 29 years for the robbery.

Under Maine law, a person is guilty of felony murder if he or she commits or attempts to commit a felony – murder, robbery, burglary, kidnapping, arson, gross sexual assault, or escape – and this causes the death of another person.

Justice Daniel Billings said there wasn’t enough evidence to convict Armstrong personally of carrying out the murder.

It is not clear who administered the fatal blows to 31-year-old Marceau in the trash-strewn, fourth-floor apartment on Washington Street from which McQuade and his girlfriend Zina Fritze had been evicted. Fritze committed suicide in jail a day after pleading not guilty to the murder charge.

Davis and McQuade blamed Armstrong for the fatal beating. Armstrong did not testify at his trial.

Billings unsealed the two cooperation agreements Friday. The agreements, signed Aug. 22, 2017, say that the murder charges against Davis and McQuade will be dismissed when they are sentenced on the felony murder and robbery charges.

Davis agreed to a sentence of 30 years – 10 years suspended. He was not called to testify at Armstrong’s trial.

McQuade, who testified at Armstrong’s trial and said he saw Armstrong beat Marceau to death, agreed to a sentence of 25 years, with 10-15 years suspended.

McQuade also is to be sentenced on a series of burglary, theft and burglary of a motor vehicle charges to which he previously pleaded no contest.

McQuade testified that Armstrong wanted to rob Marceau of 5 grams of heroin and that McQuade and Fritze accompanied Davis, Armstrong and Marceau to the apartment.

He said he saw Marceau standing with his back to the entry door and Armstrong and Davis facing him.

“Immediately a milk bottle came smashing down across Joe’s head,” McQuade testified. “It was like a nanosecond, then Doughboy came smashing down with a chair across his head.”

McQuade said during the first 10 seconds Marceau hollered for them to “just take it,” meaning the drugs, but the beating didn’t stop.

 

Two more men sentenced in 2015 murder case

AUGUSTA, Maine (WABI) – Two more men were sentenced Monday for their involvement in the 2015 murder of Joseph Marceau

.Michael “Dirty” Sean McQuade received 12 years in jail for his guilty plea of felony murder and robbery.

Damik “Doughboy” Davis got 20 years behind bars on the same charges.

The sentences were reduced due to cooperation in the investigation from both individuals.

Maine Assistant Attorney General John Alsop says there were no surprises, as they reached deals beforehand.

“Both cases – these outcomes were something that we agreed upon some time ago,” says Alsop. “Both of these gentlemen agreed to cooperate and testify against Mr. Armstrong.”

The defense teams were also satisfied with the deals reached.

“I think that Michael McQuade realized that this is a terrible tragedy and has taken responsibility for that, so I think it’s been good that there’s been closure for both him and the family,” says Andrew Wright, McQuade’s defense attorney.

“Mr. Davis received a 20 year sentence,” says Stephen Smith, Davis’ defense attorney. “We’re pleased with the outcome. It was a negotiated outcome.”

Aubrey Armstrong was given 30 years in jail earlier this month for his role in the murder.

True Believers:

A while ago we sent all of the prisoners we communicate with three requests for advice gathered from various advice columns.  We received advice back from Daniel ‘Prince’ Fortune (M.S.P./serving two life sentences for home invasion,) Michael ‘Dirty’ McQuade (M.S.P./ serving 12 years for murder,) and Arline Lawless (M.C.C./serving 35 years for murder) and we’ll post their responses this Wednesday.

Here are the requests for advice as the prisoners received them:

Problem 1: My Coworker Asked Me To Pose Topless ‘For An Anatomy Textbook’?

I work part-time in a small sales office of about 10 people. About a month ago, one of my coworkers approached me about doing a project for his graduate program at a local university. It was for some sort of anatomy textbook or similar: it would be a photo of my breasts with my face not in the photo for the textbook. I would be compensated for the photos.

There were some red flags in his proposition — the photos would be taken by him, in my home, and he never presented me with official paperwork about it. I called the university and they assured me that whatever “project” he was working on was not through their university, as there would have been extensive paperwork, screening, photos professionally taken, etc., which was what I had figured in the first place, particularly for such a large university and for a master’s program.  My question is this: Is this a matter that I should bring up to my boss? Is this something that she needs to know about?

Sincerely, A.

Problem 2. Do I Have To Tell The Daughter I Abandoned At Birth That I Trash-Talked Her Late Mom For Years?

When I was about 20, I got my girlfriend pregnant. She was 23 and wanted the baby whereas I was not ready to be a father, so she broke up with me and had the baby pretty much on her own. Her family helped her and she didn’t ask me for child support until I graduated college and had a steady job. Still, it was a burden on my entry-level salary and I resented both her and my daughter, so I wasn’t an involved father. To explain myself to my family and others who knew I had a daughter I hardly saw, I made up stories about how horrible and crazy my ex was and how it was all her fault…

My ex contacted me last year to let me know she had a terminal illness. As a new father to a year-old son, I saw I couldn’t let my 18-year-old daughter, “Lynn,” go through that alone, so I reconnected with her, made peace with my ex and have been trying to make amends.  Lynn naturally resents and distrusts me, but she is slowly becoming a part of my life. The problem is that my wife, my parents and my friends think the worst of her late mother…

Must I confess, or can I just make it up to Lynn by being the best dad I can now? The truth could really ruin our fragile relationship.

Signed “Bad Dad.”

Problem 3. Should I Tell My Friends I Think Their 5-Year-Old Son Is Going To Be A Rapist When He Grows Up?

My friends have a son, about 5 years old. They enforce little (if any) discipline on him, and he throws a hissy fit if they try to “make” him do anything. They tell him to pick up something he threw; he ignores them. Dad picks it up in a couple of minutes. They tell him to go to bed; he ignores them and keeps doing whatever he is into. My fear is that they are teaching him that he can get away with anything by ignoring the rules. Specifically, I am concerned that he will never learn that no means no, i.e., that they are raising a rapist. Should I say anything to them? If I do, it would only be once, and I wouldn’t harp on it. They are NOT people who would be okay with this outcome, and/but I don’t want to stomp on my relationship with them either.

Signed “Watching”

You’ll be completely surprised by the advice we received back, and the difference sorts of advice applied to the same problem by each inmate.  We’re going to try to get Fuzzy Bear and Sarah to give their non-prison advice, but once we’ve posted the inmate responses, we encourage you to submit your advice as well.

Or a situation that you might like to get killer advice on.

Tune in on Wednesday, and be well!

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[Image: “Killer Advice #2,” by Alyssa Joy Bartlett, 2019]

So, I’ve had an eventful couple of months. The biggest news was my direct appeal was shot down, and the State Supreme Court affirmed my life sentences. That sucked. I found out from watching the news. Unpleasant surprise to say the least. It’s a’ight, tho. I’m not sure if it’s a setback b/c I was anticipating that to happen. I know that I’m not gonna get any relief on the state level. So, as you can imagine that had me fucked up for a li’l while. But, I’m better now. What doesn’t kill you and all that. It has definitely made me realize that I need to be doing even more to better myself, and make sure I’m in the law library. I go twice a week now and I start a college prep class on Tuesday,. I’m re-educating myself and it feels good. My mind feels uncloudy and I’m working on and for my future.

As I am,

Prince

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Write to Prince via:

Maine State Prison – Daniel Fortune, MDOC #86753

807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

 

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Write to  Arline via:

Maine Correctional Center – Arline Lawless – MDOC #60057

17 Mallison Falls Road – Windham, Maine 04062

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Write to Dirty via:

Maine State Prison – Michael McQuade – MDOC #82448

807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864=4600

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AUGUSTA – John P. L’Heureux, a Sanford man known for his wild rage and violent
past, is accused of killing two people, torching two houses and firing a shot
at a trooper before quietly surrendering to police early Wednesday morning, 25
hours after his crime spree began, police said.

L’Heureux, 28, has been charged with two counts of murder in the deaths of
Kristen Smith, 16, his stepdaughter, who recently completed her sophomore year
at Cony High School in Augusta; and Mary Small Turner, 87, a hairdresser and
his former landlady.

Smith was apparently beaten with a piece of wood and left half-naked in a
shallow grave outside Augusta, police said. Turner was smashed with a vacuum
cleaner and strangled before her Augusta home was set on fire, court documents
show. L’Heureux also has been charged with arson.

L’Heureux, shaggy-haired and heavy-lidded, made his first appearance in
Kennebec County District Court on Wednesday afternoon.

He did not enter a plea. A bail hearing is set for Monday. He is being held
without bail at Kennebec County Jail.

L’Heureux’s arrest came after hours of non-stop work by police from central and
southern Maine. Their efforts to solve arsons in Augusta and Shapleigh and to
find a girl missing from Vassalboro mushroomed into a manhunt for a killer.

L’Heureux, released from prison in February 1995 after serving time for a
savage attack on a Sanford woman in 1991, was the common link.

The chain of events, which spanned 90 miles, began about 11:30 p.m. Monday when
L’Heureux spotted Kristen Smith outside an Augusta convenience store, according
to an affidavit filed by police.

Beth White, 24, who was with Smith that night, said Smith told her she was
going for a ride with L’Heureux because he said he had had a fight with her
mother and he needed to talk to someone, according to police reports. Smith
never returned.

L’Heureux told detectives he drove her to St. Mary’s Cemetery in Manchester,
about three miles from downtown Augusta. Once there, he assaulted her, beat her
with a piece of poplar wood, then buried her in a shallow grave near the
cemetery, police said. Her body was found there early Wednesday morning. She
was naked from the waist down.

Police say L’Heureux left the cemetery and headed back to Augusta and Turner’s
home at 25 Myrtle St., where he and his wife and stepchildren had lived in an
upstairs apartment for seven months before moving to Sanford in mid-June.
L’Heureux knew Turner’s back door would be unlocked, police said.

”He said that he intended to kill her because she had complained about getting
old and how difficult it was growing old,” Maine State Police Detective
William Harwood wrote in his affidavit. ”He said he hit her with a vacuum
cleaner and then set the house on fire. He said that Ms. Turner was still alive
as the fire was starting and he stepped on her throat.”

Turner’s neighbors reported the fire about 2 a.m. Tuesday. Turner’s body was
found in the living room. An autopsy, performed Tuesday, showed Turner died
from strangulation, and that her face and head were battered.

Tuesday morning, as investigators sifted through Turner’s charred home, Kristen
Smith’s family reported her missing to the Kennebec County Sheriff’s Office.
Smith’s mother, Joy Robie L’Heureux drove up to Vassalboro, where Smith had been
staying with her father, Arnold Smith.

Joy Robie L’Heureux and Arnold Smith declined to comment Wednesday.

By 6 p.m. Tuesday, L’Heureux was back in southern Maine, torching a cabin in
Shapleigh, police said. Detectives said L’Heureux may have had some sort of tie
with a former caretaker of the cabin, but no specifics were provided.

Not far from the cabin, firefighters spotted a car on fire, a tip that this
fire was no accident.

A check of the car’s registration revealed the names John and Joy L’Heureux.
The puzzle was coming together with one piece missing: John L’Heureux.

L’Heureux did not make much effort to hide from police, according to court
documents. About 12:30 a.m. Wednesday, he shot out the rear window of Trooper
Gerome Carr’s cruiser as Carr left the scene of the Shapleigh fire. Police
descended on the area.

L’Heureux then stepped out of the woods and told Carr and Trooper Peter Sheldon
that he had been on the run for two days. He asked the troopers if they were
looking for him.

”Should we be?” Sheldon countered.

”I killed that old lady in Augusta and torched the house,” L’Heureux told the
troopers, according to a police affidavit.

Maine State Police Lt. Tim Doyle said police still haven’t been able to answer
one vexing question: Why did he do it?

”We’re looking into the facts and circumstances,” Doyle said. ”But right now
there is no apparent motive.”

The details of the murders dumbfounded some of L’Heureux’s acquaintances in
Augusta and Sanford.

Flossie Panek, who visted her elderly friend Mary Turner daily, and helped
Turner with her errands and her tenants, said she knew John L’Heureux as
clean-cut, quiet and well-mannered.

”I could not believe when everyone said this was the gentleman who had done
this,” Panek said. ”I thought ‘No, it can’t be.’ ”

Panek went to Kennebec County District Court to see the accused killer for
herself, and her disbelief soon turned to anger.

”This man is beyond sick,” she said.

Panek said Joy and John L’Heureux left Turner’s apartment on amicable terms
with the former landlady, after L’Heureux lost his job in Augusta.

L’Heureux’s new neighbors in Sanford were similarly disturbed by the charges.

”He seemed like a hell of a nice guy,” said Joe Dionne, who lived next door
to L’Heureux on River Road. ”My wife is in shock today.”

L’Heureux’s criminal history, however, is well-known among some in Sanford,
where he was raised and where he attacked a woman in 1991.

Tammy Andrews was beaten, then run over with a car and left – grievously
injured – by the town dump. Her pelvis was broken in four places, her hips in
nine, and for more than a week her face was swollen beyond recognition.

L’Heureux was originally charged with attempted murder in that case, but he
pleaded guilty to the lesser charge of aggravated assault because prosecutors
acknowledged their case was largely circumstantial. Andrews could not remember
the attack.

At his sentencing hearing in 1992, L’Heureux apologized to Andrews.

”There’s no excuse,” he told her. ”I know what I’ve done and I wish I could
change what happened. You were an innocent victim to my rage.”

By Sarah Ragland 
Staff writer Gregory Kesich and news assistant Will Bartlett contributed to
this report.

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Write to Kenny via:

Maine State Prison – Kenneth McDonald, MDOC #114427

807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

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Write to Joel via:

Otisville FCI – Joel Dudley – Reg. #07499-036

PO Box 1000 – Otisville, NY 10963

Monmouth Death

AUGUSTA — Janice McDonald tried to fight off a vicious knife attack by her youngest son before succumbing to her wounds on Aug. 24, 2009.

The state says it was a depraved act of murder. The defense says it was an act of manslaughter, provoked by a lifetime of abuse. A jury will decide this week in Kennebec County Superior Court.

No one says that Kenneth McDonald didn’t beat and stab his mother to death in the home they shared in Monmouth. McDonald was indicted on one count of murder, and pleaded not guilty to that charge.

In court Monday, Assistant Attorney General Leane Zainea questioned neighbors and family members about the relationship between the mother and son – the central element of Kenneth McDonald’s defense.

Most said that Kenneth McDonald, 44, was quiet, and that they never heard the two argue.

But defense attorney James Billings said the attack came after Janice McDonald repeatedly refused to let her son take a trip to the coast.

She also refused to change his doctor’s appointment and call his workplace to say he would be gone, Billings said. Kenneth McDonald worked four days every other week at the Monmouth Transfer Station.

Billings said Kenneth McDonald, who was described by family members as “slow,” depended on his mother for everything, even permission to take money out of his own bank account.

Billings told jurors that they should find Kenneth McDonald guilty of manslaughter, not murder. He said Janice McDonald was her son’s best friend, but she constantly told him he was incapable of doing anything on his own.

Billings said Kenneth McDonald asked his mother several times for permission to take a trip, until an argument broke out early on Aug. 24, 2009.

“She did not approve of the plan. She became angry. She slapped him across the face,” Billings said. “At that point, he boiled over, he snapped.

“He picked up the knife off her bedside table. He doesn’t really remember that,” Billings said. “He basically knows he stabbed his mother to death.”

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Zainea told jurors that Janice McDonald, who was 80 when she died, lay defenseless – wearing only a nightgown – as the youngest of her seven children stabbed her repeatedly.

“Her throat was cut so severely, it severed her jugular vein and her carotid artery,” the prosecutor said.

For part of Monday, witnesses testified about Kenneth McDonald’s whereabouts and calm demeanor as he made his way from Monmouth to Lewiston and finally hitchhiked to Bailey Island in the 24 hours after his mother’s death.

Wearing a light blue shirt and a light blue tie, Kenneth McDonald sat quietly through the testimony. He has been in custody since his arrest on Aug. 25, 2009.

Fourteen people testified on Monday, as the state began presenting its case. Billings told jurors that they can expect to hear from Kenneth McDonald when the defense presents its case.

Monmouth man sentenced to 30 years for killing mother

Kenneth McDonald listens to opening arguments during his murder trial Monday, Aug. 30, 2010, at Kennebec County Superior Court in Augusta, Maine. He is accused of murdering his 80-year-old mother, Janice McDonald, in August 2009. His defense attorney contends he was driven by a lifetime of abuse from her and he should be convicted of manslaughter, not murder.

AUGUSTA, Maine — A Monmouth man has been sentenced to 30 years in prison for killing his mother last year in the home they shared.

Forty-four-year-old Kenneth McDonald abruptly ended his trial on Sept. 1 when he pleaded guilty to murder in the stabbing death of 80-year-old Janice McDonald on Aug. 24, 2009. He was sentenced on Wednesday on Augusta.

WMTW-TV reports that the judge said she considered his diminished mental capacity and believed McDonald was sorry for his actions.

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Political Prisoners

Welcome to the blog from inmates of Maine's jails and prisons.

In collaboration with the Holistic Recovery Project, the Political Prisoners Blog provides a prisoner's view into what's happening at Maine's correctional facilities.

Only your vigilance on the outside can guarrentee that justice goes on on the inside.

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