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Written by Matt “Irish” Moscillo, performed by P-6 & the Windham Philharmonic.  From the CD, “Three More Julys,” produced and recorded  by Guitardoors.org on location at the Maine Correctional Center / Windham Prison, back in 2010.

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What’s poppin’?

I’m tired of wondering if everyone that I care about out there is okay, or strung out, or overdosed.

My man just got shot a couple of months ago.  Another is fighting a body (murder.)

I am tired of hearing bad news from people.

As I am,

Prince

danny2

Daniel ‘Prince’ Fortune

Write to Price via:

Maine State Prison – Daniel Fortune – MDOC #86753

807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04564-4600

I hope things are looking up.  It might not feel that way, though.

We listen to country every weekend mornings.  I prefer rap and R & B.  But, it’s all we got.  I miss good music, but we get to listen to church music which isn’t all that bad, makes me cry usually.

In art we are making a book with all our art work and writings.,  I drew a picture of a girl.  I took half a face from a magazine and cut it in half and drew the other half.  It came out sooo good and wrote a few poems.  One was about finding God.

If I was my old sef when I get out I would be hateful to everyone who put me here but now that I have God he has shown me to forgive and not judge.  I will never forget anything we learned here.  It truly opened my eyes.  and it sucks I’m here but I’m thankful for was it has taught me.

On a side note, a girl in here got all mad because one of the new girls kept throwing the empty toilet paper roll on the floor so she took all the t.p. and would only let me and my cellie use it.  One of the new girls waa really pissed and took all our lunch trays and threw them across the room.  LOL! We had vegetable soup and rice everywhere.  All over the walls.  What a fun mess that was cleaning.  She said sorry to everyone though.  But it was crazy.

Keep praying!

A-rain-filled-Tabitha

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Governor Janet Mills and members of the Washington County delegation announced a plan to reopen the Downeast Correctional Facility Friday. The operation will be significantly smaller than it was before its 2018 closure.

MACHIASPORT, Maine — Reopening the Downeast Correctional Facility was high on the list of Governor Janet Mills’ campaign promises. On Friday, that plan got one step closer. Governor Mills and the Washington County delegation agreed to terms to build a new pre-release center on the DCF property.

“This is great news. This is awesome news. This is what we’ve been hoping for,” said Sen. Marianne Moore (R – Washington).

RELATED: DCF resurrected in deal to build pre-release center on lot

“We’re going to get a better facility, we’re going to a get a new and improved rebuilt facility when this has all come to fruition,” said Rep. Will Tuell (R-East Machias).

The facility is scheduled to open in two years. It will employ 15, down from the 50 that worked at the previous facility. It will hold 50 inmates, down from 150.

RELATED: Department of Corrections looks for new facility

Reopening the facility has been a mission for those in Machiasport and Washington County since its closure in 2018. Many are now optimistic.

“As a town we’d like some kind of stability down here, and this would be a wonderful place to start that,” said Machiasport Selectmen Jeffrey Davis.

Times have been tough for Machiasport residents since the facility’s closure. In addition to the nearly 50 employees who were laid off, many local businesses also lost the chance to have inmates in the prison’s work release program assist their businesses.

“I’ve seen how this is effecting our community. I’ve seen the things we don’t have now because of it, and it’s sad,” said Machiasport resident Melissa Hinerman.

RELATED: Corrections facility may return to Washington County

Although there will only be 15 jobs, compared to the previous 50, retired DCF employee Kevin Millay is excited to see any amount of jobs back in his county. “That’s a lot of staff for Washington County. You may not think that in Windham or Bangor, but it’s a start.”

Other former employees however are disappointed the new facility wont provide as many jobs or as many inmates.

“That’s not what we deserve and that’s not what’s best for the town,” said DCF employee of 24 years JJ Tibbetts.

For many of the former employees, an additional two years is a long time to wait to get back to work. When the facility opens, residents hope it can help alleviate some of the stresses caused by the closure.

“Please, arrest someone!  We need people to guard!”

‘It’s a very good day for Downeast’: Machiasport’s new facility will retain the Downeast Correctional Facility name and house 50 prisoners and 15 staff.

MACHIASPORT, Maine — A new pre-release center will be built on the grounds of the existing property of Downeast Correctional Center in Machiasport, Gov. Janet Mills and Washington County lawmakers jointly announced Friday.

The new facility will house up to 50 minimum-security prisoners and employ 15 staff, the governor’s office said. It will also retain its name of DCF.

“It’s a very good day for Downeast,” Rep. William Tuell, R-East Machias, told NEWS CENTER Maine.

Gov. Mills’ office said the Department of Corrections (DOC) has obtained estimates for design, demolition, and construction, with an estimated budget of $6.5 to $8 million. The DOC is working with the Bureau of Real Estate (BREM) to develop a request for qualifications for an architectural design, setting up the first step in a design-bid-build approach to reopening DCF.

An earlier proposal aimed to open a facility elsewhere in the county.

RELATED: Department of Corrections looks for new facility
RELATED: Washington County prison will house 50 inmates — but where?

Construction is estimated to take about 24 months before an opening.

The DOC is expected to engage with unions, including on the issue of extending recall rights of former employees, the governor’s office said.

Funding will come from a state government bond, approved in 2016, which also funds a remodel of Windham’s Maine Correctional Center.

Mills said she was proud her administration was able to work closely with state Sen. Marianne Moore, R-Washington; and Reps. Tuell; Rep. Kathy Javner, R-Chester; Rep. Billy Bob Faulkingham, R-Winter Harbor; and Rep. Robert Alley, D-Beals.

“As someone who fought to keep DCF open, I understand how important it is to the people of Washington County and I shared in their frustration when it was closed,” Mills said in a statement. “I thank the Washington County Delegation for working with me and Commissioner Liberty to rectify this situation as best we could and ensure that DCF continues on in this new facility.”

RELATED: Corrections facility may return to Washington County
RELATED: Downeast Corrections gets support from new budget

Tuell thanked the governor and her administration.

“We are very happy the Administration is keeping DCF where it is and keeping a promise to the people of Washington County,” he said. “Our delegation was committed to the current DCF location, and we are very pleased with the outcome.”

Sen. Moore was relieved an agreement had been made.

“I am happy to have been able to work with [Mills] and my fellow Washington County delegation to finally put to rest the issue of Downeast Correctional Facility so the local community can finally move forward with a resolution,” Moore said. “While the new facility won’t be to the scale of what DCF once was, it will once again provide an important service to our state and economy.”

DOC Commissioner Randall A. Liberty said it felt good to common ground with former DCF employees and lawmakers. “This new facility will keep alive the deeply rooted correctional tradition of the region,” he said.

 

Dear viewers,

None of the contributors to this blog write us for the purpose of ending up on the blog.  Although in the beginning (and next year the Political Prisoners Blog will be ten years old) we solicited and posted, anonymously, things written specifically for the blog, that isn’t necessarily so for all of our current inmate contributors.

Having had relationships with the current roster for over at least three years minimum, most of the entries that you’ll view these days are excerpts taken from personal correspondence between the inmates and the members of the project.  We let everyone know, early on, that excerpts of their letters to us may be used in the blog; far more remains un-posted.  Convicts in Maine, of course, have no way of viewing the blog, or of seeing responses posted to their entries, unless we forward them on.

Recently, Arline Lawless whose content has been featured in blog since January of 2016 was written up for posting to “social media,” referring to a Maine Department of Corrections ban on the same.  She was initially looking at a loss of earned good time, although presently she faces eight days of room restriction.

Unfortunately, until this issue is resolved you’ll be seeing no more contributions from Arline Lawless.

Sincerely,

The Holistic Recovery Project.

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Write to Arline via:

M.C.C. – Arline Lawless – MDOC #60057

17 Mallison Falls Road – Windham, Maine 04062

Holistic Recovery Project,

Thank you.  Thank you for thinking of me and praying for me.  I’ve found myself looking to God in this desperate time in my life.  Needing the guidance and structure.

This is my first time in “trouble” with the law.  So going to jail for something like this was very scary.  Especially knowing I’m not guilty and I have only to hope my attorney can prove it.  I have a lot of time over my head and it makes me so sad.

Thankfully the c/o’s here are great, along with the girls.  I have realized I have more support outside than I had thought, which brings me hope.  Not knowing is absolutely the hardest thing right now.  I have bail hearing [near the end of the month.] If all goes well, I’ll be able to have a little more time of freedom, so please pray for me.

Thank you for the [“Free stuff for convicts”] list.  And thank you guys for being the first people to write to me.  Keep praying for me.  I need all of the strength I can get, I find myself struggling daily.  I’ve only been here for days and it feels like so long.  How did you guys do it?  I’ve been reading books daily and doing inmate programs to make time go by faster.  I’m terrified I’m going to be stuck here for a while.  Thank you again for reaching out to me.  It means a lot.

God bless,

A-rain-filled-Tabitha

Female prisoners are being "excessively strip searched"

AUGUSTA — Tonia Kigas Porter was freed from state custody Friday for the first time in almost 20 years.

The 49-year-old woman had been committed to the commissioner of the Department of Health & Human Services after being found not criminally responsible for murder for starving her 5-year-old daughter to death in 1993 in Bangor.

A judge in Kennebec County Superior Court ordered Porter discharged after the state, her psychiatrist and the State Forensic Service said they all supported it for Porter, who most recently was diagnosed and treated for cancer.

“She has managed those losses and difficulties with great dignity,” said Ann LeBlanc, director of the State Forensic Service.

Porter has been living in Augusta and doing volunteer work there for years and getting support from people in the community.

Justice Donald Marden asked LeBlanc what Porter’s reaction would be to seeing her photo in the newspaper.

“She’s learned one day your picture shows up on the front page and two days later, people forget about it,” LeBlanc said.

Marden said statements by those testifying on Friday convinced him that Porter has worked hard to recover.

“There’s no question Ms. Porter bears a heavy burden,” Marden said.

J. Mitchell Flick, Porter’s attorney, told the judge Porter is particularly conscientious about taking her medication and “extremely likely to succeed.”

Assistant Attorney General Laura Yustak Smith said that once Porter recovered from her severe psychosis, she was distressed and remorseful about what she had done.

“I think it’s a good thing when a person recognizes how serious it was and has the remorse because that’s the beginning of the recovery and can give the public some comfort that the person knows this was a bad thing,” Yustak Smith said.

Porter was committed to state custody in 1995.

Yustak Smith said she contacted family members of the victim prior to the hearing to discuss Porter’s potential discharge, and learned one was deceased and the other did not want to attend the hearing.

Porter hugged treatment providers and others from Riverview Psychiatric Center and from the hospital’s Assertive Community Treatment Team.

She is expected to continue with community-based treatment.

During a separate hearing in the same court Friday, Kirk T. Lambert also was discharged from the custody of the commissioner.

Lambert, 33, had been committed to state custody in 2000, following a verdict of not criminally responsible for robbery in an incident in which his lawyer said he wheeled a TV out of Walmart.

LeBlanc testified that Lambert was admitted to Riverview “and he stabilized quite quickly on medications.” She also said he has been dealing with an ongoing substance abuse issue.

Lambert has moved several times between the state hospital and the community, and several witnesses said he appeared overly dependent on Riverview and it was time for him to move on now that his mental illness is being treated and there has been no evidence of psychosis.

Instead of readmitting him recently, LeBlanc said, the hospital offered him a list of homeless shelters.

LeBlanc described Lambert, whose head is shaved, as “a good hair cutter,” and a person who is creative and makes beautiful quilts.

She said it appeared unlikely he would injure himself or others and that he plans to move to northern Maine where his father is a registered Maine Guide.

“He has been clean and sober for six months and quite committed to staying clean and sober,” she said.

LeBlanc said Lambert “was compassionate to other people with major mental illness who couldn’t help themselves.”

In March 2013, Lambert was a patient at Riverview when he was credited with rescuing a mental health worker there who was under attack by another patient.

The state, through Assistant District Attorney David Spencer, raised no objection to Lambert’s release.

“You are entitled to be discharged and have worked hard to bring yourself to this position,” Marden told Lambert. “You have some issues that you’re really going to have to stay on top of if you’re going to stay out of trouble.”

Marden warned him that people who don’t address substance issues “become very involved in the criminal justice system. In the final analysis, what happens is entirely up to you.”

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Political Prisoners

Welcome to the blog from inmates of Maine's jails and prisons.

In collaboration with the Holistic Recovery Project, the Political Prisoners Blog provides a prisoner's view into what's happening at Maine's correctional facilities.

Only your vigilance on the outside can guarrentee that justice goes on on the inside.

If you'd like to contact one of our inmate bloggers, send us an email.

Thanks for reading, and thanks for your support.

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