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Hello.

Well, my birthday is June 18th, 1966, which makes me 52 years old.  I’m getting old, but I still don’t have any gray or white hair.  Well, during the weekend we had our yearly three-day lock down and guess what?  They took our big plastic totes away from us and replaced them with two light, plastic ones that are see-through.  They are much easier to carry around and a lot lighter even with all my stuff in them.

Earl Huntley is doing fine and his mom just sent him a Wiccan Bible.  As for British Columbia, for some reason, I was thinking of sneaking across the border after I get out and living there.  Probably in Quathiaski Cove; I love the name of that town.  Plus, some of the Canadian town names sound perfect for Dungeons and Dragons.

Well, it’s almost Thanksgiving.  Anyone made any plans?

Bless you all and have a happy Thanksgiving.

Kenneth McDonald, MDOC# 114427

Bolduc Correction Facility = 516 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

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Citizens,

How is everyone?  I can’t really say I am good.  A lot going on here, but you know me.  I am strong.  I will be okay.

I thought that I would write, for I guess you could say that I want to see if my friends are really back, or if you guys were just letting me know you were still alive.

I know everyone has a life, don’t get that wrong, but even as you guys said, it has been so long since I heard from anyoe I just don’t know if it is just my head playing games or if it is real.

Sorry you know how my depression gets some days plus when I am alone in my head you know it is never good.  I wrote Arline (Lawless) as you see, I just hope I start hearing from her again but fuck it would only be too good to be true, you know?

So how is your weather?  It is foggy as all hell here at Mt. Hell, yes, one of the c/o’s told me that today (LOL) I guess you could say it was a cool name for this place.

I am going to lay down and head to bed, see if I can get some sleep for it is 1130pm here and I need to be up by 5 am for work even though tomorrow might be my last day I will let you guys know.

Love to all,

Joel Dudley

http://bangordailynews.com/2012/08/22/news/portland/westbrook-father-of-three-girls-charged-for-possessing-child-pornography/

 

Dear people,

Tell junkies to finally listen to you and get sub doctors, so that they have a better chance at a happy life, and if they can help their addiction, the weight will be lifted and true freedom will beckon them.  Be fearless and beautiful, because every single junkie needs to follow your example for it.  Do the deeds and the deeds will be done, no matter how many times we attempt it.  If all else fails, we’ll all fail.

Love,

G.Raff

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As I am,

Prince

Maine State Prison – Daniel Fortune, #86753

807 Cushing Road, Warren, Maine 04864-4600

 

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LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01

There are 2.2 million people in the nation’s prisons and jails—a 500% increase over the last 40 years. Changes in law and policy, not changes in crime rates, explain most of this increase. The results are overcrowding in prisons and fiscal burdens on states, despite increasing evidence that large-scale incarceration is not an effective means of achieving public safety.


International Rates of Incarceration per 100,000
0200400600U.S.RwandaRussiaBrazilAustraliaSpainChinaCanadaFranceAustriaGermanyDenmarkSwedenIndia

Country Incarceration rate (per 100,000)
U.S. 670
Rwanda 434
Russia 413
Brazil 325
Australia 167
Spain 126
China 118
Canada 114
France 102
Austria 94
Germany 78
Denmark 59
Sweden 57
India 33
Data source: International Centre for Prison Studies. Download chart

U.S. State and Federal Prison Population, 1925-2016
192519301936194219481954196019661972197819841990199620022008201120140500,0001,000,0001,500,000

Year Population
1925 91,669
1926 97,991
1928 116,390
1930 129,453
1932 137,997
1934 138,316
1936 145,038
1938 160,285
1940 173,706
1942 150,384
1944 132,456
1946 140,079
1948 155,977
1950 166,123
1952 168,233
1954 182,901
1956 189,565
1958 205,643
1960 212,953
1962 218,830
1964 214,336
1966 199,654
1968 187,914
1970 196,429
1972 196,092
1974 218,466
1976 262,833
1978 294,396
1980 315,974
1982 395,516
1984 443,398
1986 522,084
1988 603,732
1990 739,980
1992 846,277
1994 1,016,691
1996 1,137,722
1998 1,245,402
2000 1,331,278
2002 1,380,516
2004 1,496,629
2006 1,570,861
2008 1,610,446
2009 1,613,740
2010 1,605,127
2011 1,598,780
2012 1,571,013
2013 1,516,879
2014 1,508,636
2015 1,476,847
2016 1,458,173
Data source: Bureau of Justice Statistics. Download chart

How did this happen?

We started sending more people to prison.

A series of law enforcement and sentencing policy changes of the “tough on crime” era resulted in dramatic growth in incarceration. Since the official beginning of the War on Drugs in 1982, the number of people incarcerated for drug offenses in the U.S. skyrocketed from 40,900 in 1980 to 450,345 in 2016. Today, there are more people behind bars for a drug offense than the number of people who were in prison or jail for any crime in 1980. The number of people sentenced to prison for property and violent crimes has also increased even during periods when crime rates have declined.

People in Prisons & Jails for Drug Offenses, 1980 & 2016
19802016State PrisonsFederal PrisonsJails060,000120,000180,000

Location 1980 2016
State Prisons 19,000 197,200
Federal Prisons 4,700 81,900
Jails 17,200 171,245
Data source: Bureau of Justice Statistics; The Sentencing Project. Download chart

We started sending people to prison for much longer terms.

Number of People Serving Life Sentences, 1984-2016
1984199220032005200820122016050,000100,000150,000

Year Number of People Serving Life Sentences
1984 34,000
1992 69,845
2003 127,677
2005 132,000
2008 142,727
2012 157,966
2016 161,957
Data source: The Sentencing Project. Download chart
Harsh sentencing laws like mandatory minimums, combined with cutbacks in parole release, keep people in prison for longer periods of time. The National Research Council reported that half of the 222% growth in the state prison population between 1980 and 2010 was due to an increase of time served in prison for all offenses. There has also been a historic rise in the use of life sentences: one in nine people in prison is now serving a life sentence, nearly a third of whom are sentenced to life without parole.

Mass incarceration has not touched all communities equally

The racial impact of mass incarceration

Sentencing policies, implicit racial bias, and socioeconomic inequity contribute to racial disparities at every level of the criminal justice system. Today, people of color make up 37% of the U.S. population but 67% of the prison population. Overall, African Americans are more likely than white Americans to be arrested; once arrested, they are more likely to be convicted; and once convicted, they are more likely to face stiff sentences. Black men are six times as likely to be incarcerated as white men and Hispanic men are more than twice as likely to be incarcerated as non-Hispanic white men.

Lifetime Likelihood of Imprisonment for U.S. Residents Born in 2001

lifetime likelihood

This estimate is based on data from 2001. Data source: Bureau of Justice Statistics. Download infographic

Mass incarceration and public safety

Incarceration has some impact on crime, but the impact is one of diminishing returns.

Crime rates have declined substantially since the early 1990s, but studies suggest that rising imprisonment has not played a major role in this trend. The National Research Council concluded that while prison growth was a factor in reducing crime, “the magnitude of the crime reduction remains highly uncertain and the evidence suggests it was unlikely to have been large.” Several factors explain why this impact was relatively modest.

First, incarceration is particularly ineffective at reducing certain kinds of crimes: in particular, youth crimes, many of which are committed in groups, and drug crimes. When people get locked up for these offenses, they are easily replaced on the streets by others seeking an income or struggling with addiction.

Second, people tend to “age out” of crime. Research shows that crime starts to peak in the mid- to late- teenage years and begins to decline when individuals are in their mid-20s. After that, crime drops sharply as adults reach their 30s and 40s. The National Research Council study concludes:

“Because recidivism rates decline markedly with age, lengthy prison sentences, unless they specifically target very high-rate or extremely dangerous offenders, are an inefficient approach to preventing crime by incapacitation.”

As a result, the excessive sentencing practices in the U.S. are largely counterproductive and extremely costly.

State Expenditures on Corrections in Billions, 1985-2016
1985199019952000200520102016015304560

Year State Expenditures on Corrections
1985 $6.7 Billion
1990 $16.9 Billion
1995 $26.1 Billion
2000 $36.4 Billion
2005 $42.3 Billion
2010 $51.4 Billion
2016 $57.7 Billion
Data source: National Association of State Budget Officers. Download chart

Significant reforms in recent years

After nearly 40 years of continued growth, the U.S. prison population has stabilized in recent years.

This is partially a result of declining crime rates, but has largely been achieved through pragmatic changes in policy and practice. For more than a decade, the political climate of criminal justice reform has been evolving toward evidence-based, commonsense approaches to public safety. This can be seen in a variety of legislative, judicial, and policy changes that have successfully decreased incarceration without adverse impacts on public safety.

At the state level:

  • California voters passed ballot measure Proposition 47 in 2014, which reclassified certain low-level property and drug crimes from felonies to misdemeanors, and will reinvest some of the fiscal savings into prevention programs
  • New York policymakers reformed the Rockefeller drug laws in 2009, which imposed harsh mandatory minimum sentences for low-level drug offenses

At the federal level:

  • In 2014, the United States Sentencing Commission unanimously voted to reduce excessive sentences for up to 46,000 people currently serving time for federal drug offenses
  • Congress passed the Fair Sentencing Act in 2010, which reduced the disparity in sentencing between crack and powder cocaine offenses
    As promising as these changes may be, we are a long way from solving our national problem of mass incarceration—and the way forward is clear.

Where do we need to go from here?

Just as a bicycle works best when it uses different gears based on the terrain, we need a justice system that has different responses for different situations—shifting gears to treatment, prevention, and long-term public safety solutions as appropriate. By taking a practical approach to criminal justice reform, we can decrease crime, enhance public safety, and make more responsible use of our resources.

In particular, we need to start by:

  • Eliminating mandatory minimum sentences and cutting back on excessively lengthy sentences; for example, by imposing a 20-year maximum on prison terms.
  • Shifting resources to community-based prevention and treatment for substance abuse.
  • Investing in interventions to that promote strong youth development and respond to delinquency in age-appropriate and evidence-based ways.
  • Examining and addressing the policies and practices, conscious or not, that contribute to racial inequity at every stage of the justice system.
  • Removing barriers that make it harder for individuals with criminal records to turn their lives around.

Well,

The grass is getting even greener now.  I guess summer is on its way here.  Been watching surfing on TV this afternoon.  Tell you the truth the last time I watched surfing was back in 1979.  So it’s been a long time.  Strangest thing is, in 1979 I remember watching a surfer by the name of Kelly Slater competing.  This afternoon there was a Kelly Slater surfing and I think it’s the same one.  Kinda crazy.

Kenneth McDonald

How is everyone?  I guess you could say I am good.  Be a lot better when I am back in Maine.

I have been doing a lot of work on the Ministry.  I guess you could say when I get out of the halfway house Paster McFeeley and I will need to get together for about a week straight and see where we stand.  I know that I will get together with a lawyer friend and file for non-profit status but as you see I go under “Christ Mission.”  I thought for Christ Mission because I feel it is my mission from Christ to spread his Word through prisons and ex-inmates.

I know we also need to put a board of directors together plus our by-laws for the board; you can trust me this is a night and day thing.  I guess once I find a place to live in August I will start my work on that.

So how has life been for everyone out there?  Arline (Lawless) and I have not really spoken much only because we have not had anyone who could forward our mail.  I guess you could say my mom did her best.

I am going to let you guys go for now but I will write you more later.  I just hope I can find the money for more stamps tomorrow.

Joel Dudley

Dearest people,

It is well in this psychiatric facility.  If feels like a poopy diaper and a petri dish.  I realize that the darker I get about food old childhood says, the more comfortable I become and happily balanced between love and surrender.  Essentially, my life was a pretty good one.  And then it went to shit, and I love myself for it.  I can be both crazy and abiding and still love the life I hate.  That’s just my little spew I’e been doing for as long as my first memories.  Cracking my neck finally.

I just feel stoned by my grittiest thoughts making me fall into the leaf–covered traps.  I”m on and off between my true feeling and the realest of reality feelings.  I can’t come to grips with it.  Help me from having myself like that childhood weird tongue-ly taste buds would perturb that stroke of genius.  I hate feeling that cloud of power, and I think I might like Gary Jules right now.

Love, Maggie

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Political Prisoners

Welcome to the blog from inmates of Maine's jails and prisons.

In collaboration with the Holistic Recovery Project, the Political Prisoners Blog provides a prisoner's view into what's happening at Maine's correctional facilities.

Only your vigilance on the outside can guarrentee that justice goes on on the inside.

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