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Write to Arline via:

Maine Correctional Center – Arline Lawless – MDOC #60057

17 Mallison Falls Road – Windham, Maine 04062

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Well, something’s have been happening in the prison here.  A little while ago we all were locked down  (the entire prison was locked down) and they did what they called “inventory”.  They came through the pods and cleaned everybody out of anything extra that they were not supposed to have.  This went on from Tuesday until Thursday and they wouldn’t even let us out to shower until it was over.  We got out Thursday night.  First thing I did when they let us out was to take a shower and that felt good, too.  For a while now after we leave the chow hall we have been getting patted down and now before we leave the pods we get patted down before we go to chow and we still get patted down after we leave chow.  They have also come up with the idea for separate recs for both the close and medium units.  Guess too many fights have been breaking out for their tastes and they are trying to put a stop to it.  They said that they want us to feel “safe”, but I think that they really don’t want to make out paperwork and the ones that are trying to actually keep safe are the sex offenders and rats (most of which are probably over in medium).  Other than that, everything is just peachy keen.

McDonald Plea

Write to Kenny via:

Maine State Prison – Kenneth McDonald – MDOC #114427

807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

On July 9, 1806, Augusta resident Capt. James Purrington murdered his wife Elizabeth (“Betsey”) and six of his Eight children and then took his own life.  The next day a large public funeral was held, during which the bodies of the slain family members were laid to rest in what was apparently an unmarked grave in the then Burnt Hill (now Mt. Vernon) cemetery. Capt. Purrington was buried along with the murder weapons (an axe and a razor) in the highway at the southeast corner of the cemetery.

Recently, the Augusta Historic Preservation Commission located the site of the family grave and placed a marker at the location, completing the work of honoring the victims of this horrid act of family violence.

 


Family Members

Spouse: 

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Elizabeth Clifford Purrington, (?–1806)
Children:

Polly Purrington, (17871806)

Martha Purrington, (17911806)

Benjamin Purrington, (17941806)

Anna Purrington, (17961806)

Nathaniel Purrington, (17981806)

Nathan Purrington, (18001806)

Louisa Purrington, (18041806)

 

How’s Circle? It’s always good to hear from y’all.

These last couple of months have been hard. I lost everything that I had worked for in one hour. I’m starting over at the bottom It’s been a crazy couple months. The Warden came down to see me. He told me that if I didn’t behave I was getting in a lot of trouble. They (I.P.S.) had been fucking with me for 2+ years, with no write-ups or charges. I was removed from the L.T.R. Board, placed in a disciplinary pod. I can’t go to Rec. It’s crazy. They kept treating me like I was acting up, so I started acting up. The Warden noticed and we had a hard talk. Now I’m starting from the bottom, but I’m in a way better place mentally, emotionally and spiritually. I had lost my way but I’m better now.

I want y’all to be better, because I’m doing better.

As I am,

Love,

Your brother, Prince.

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Write to Danny via:

Maine State Prison – Daniel Fortune – MDOC #86753

807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

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Write to Arline via:

Maine Correctional Center – Arline Lawless – MDOC #60057

17 Mallison Falls Road – Windham, Maine o4062

LEAD Technologies Inc. V1.01

(We let Kenny know that we would.)

McDonald Plea

Write to Kenny Via:

Maine State Prison – Kenneth McDonald – MDOC #114427

807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

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Write to Joel via:

FCI Otisville – Joel Dudley – Reg. #07499-036

PO Box 1000 – Otisville, NY 10963

George W. Bush DUI Arrest Record

Bush Drunk Driving Summary

This is the 1976 Maine police document recording the arrest of George W. Bushfor driving under the influence of alcohol.

Bush, who was 30 at the time, was popped over the Labor Day weekend near his family’s Kennebunkport summer home. Bush pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor DUI charge, paid a $150 fine, and had his driving privileges briefly revoked in the state of Maine.

The arrest record card was released November 2 by Kennebunkport police. The Maine Bureau of Motor Vehicles also released this summary of Bush’s DUI conviction. (2 pages)

Not to be outdone, Dick Cheney has two drunk driving busts on his record.

Yes, we’ve all got questions about George W. Bush’s 1976 drunk driving arrest. But the Bush campaign isn’t really answering them (at least not yet), while the silence of the Gore campaign is deafening. So we’ve decided to cut through the spin and go behind the scenes for a few technical pointers on Maine driving laws. Here is everything you ever wanted to know about drunk driving arrests (or have at least wondered about in the past 24 hours).

What’s the difference between a DWI, a DUI and an OUI?

There’s absolutely no difference. Maine happens to use the term “Operating Under the Influence,” or OUI, but other states use DUI or DWI. They all mean the same thing.

Is drunk driving a felony or misdemeanor in Maine?

These days, your fourth OUI conviction in a 10-year period is considered a felony. Back in 1976, drunk driving was considered a misdemeanor into infinity — unless there was an accident, which could elevate the charge.

What was the penalty for an OUI arrest in 1976?

George W. Bush paid a $150 fine and his license was suspended for 30 days. Because Bush carried an out-of-state driver’s license (his address was recorded as Midland, Tex.), the suspension carried weight only in Maine. In other words, Bush could have had someone drive him to the state line, hop in the driver’s seat and tool off (legally) into the sunset.

These days, the penalties are stiffer, and most states adhere to an agreement providing reciprocity: A license suspension in Maine, for example, would carry over into Texas.

Has the legal limit for blood alcohol content (BAC) changed since 1976?

In 1976, when Bush was arrested, the legal limit had just been lowered from .15 to .10. Bush’s BAC reportedly measured .10.

Today’s law puts the limit at .08. If you’re arrested and have a BAC between .08 and .15, you’re issued a standard DUI charge. If your BAC goes above .15, you’re stuck with mandatory jail time.

Can a drunk driving arrest be expunged from your record?

Back in ’76, OUI charges were removed from the driver’s record six years after the offense occurred.

Within the first 10 years after the arrest, a driver’s record shows a drunk driving conviction, with various details. After 10 years, a record will only show a past violation, without details. A casual observer wouldn’t be able to pick out a drunk driving conviction by glancing over a 24-year-old arrest record. You have to know what you’re looking for.

Thanks to State Trooper Lt. Theodore Short of York County, Maine (where Kennebunkport is located).

(How many times was he detained for drinking and driving before they were finally forced to arrest him?)

So, as I’m sure you can tell by the paper and the pen, I’m in the Box again.

So, yeah, Friday the 13th.  So it was a regular day and I was supposed to take my college readiness final.  Actually, I was supposed to take it last Tuesday, but I wasn’t ready, so I pushed it back to Friday.

So, I’m up at the yard, and I see somebody who had done something he shouldn’t have the last time I’d seen him.  So I looked at him.  He saw me.  I walked over to him, and we started shaking.  (When you shake, it’s a really good fight.  If it’s just so-so, it’s just a fight.)  So,  mind you, this is right out in the middle of the gym.  He was standing 15-20 feet from a c/o, but he, the inmate, wasn’t gonna move away from the c/o, so we got it on right there.  It was bloody.  He gave me my first-ever bloody nose (those are a bitch.  It bleeds a lot.)  and I split his eye, nose and lips.  Plus, his tooth got in the way of my hand, and split my knuckle to the bone.  It took stitches to close it.  Should’ve been more, but the doctor just pulled until it closed.  His eye got ten stitches.

We got maced with the big riot-fog cans.  They are about the size of a can of tennis balls.  That was unpleasant, to say the least.  I felt like I was on fire.

So, as you can imagine, I got lugged.  Now, they’re saying I can go back to population sometime next week, but I have to be on a behavior plan.  I can’t go to the yard for 30 days, except for school or religious purposes.  I have to have a room by the c/o’s desk.

Just some juvenile bullshit.  It is  what it is, though.  I bought it, and I’ma pay for it.  It was something I felt I had to do, so I did it.  I’m not saying I’m right, but it’s over now, and time only moves in one direction.

To change the subject, I just had the MOST AMAZING conversation I’ve ever had since I’ve been up here.  The person I was talking to was X.  He is one of the smartest people I’ve ever met.  I could write pages on him, but I won’t.  I’ma just give you just one point of the convo.  He asks: What is a human, and what separates us from the animals.  Me, I don’t know.  Answer:  the ability to dream.  Then we talked about the difference between dreams and ambitions.  Ambitions are something you want to do, have, and see (and get this, b/c it’s mind-boggling.)  A dream is God talking to you.

A dream is God talking to you.

As I am,

Prince

Fortune, Daniel

Write to Prince via:

Maine State Prison – Daniel Fortune – MDOC #86753

807 Cushing Road – Warren, Maine 04864-4600

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arline.july.2017Write to Arline via:

Maine Correctional Center – Arline Lawless – MDOC #60057

17 Mallison Falls Road – Windham, Maine 04062

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Political Prisoners

Welcome to the blog from inmates of Maine's jails and prisons.

In collaboration with the Holistic Recovery Project, the Political Prisoners Blog provides a prisoner's view into what's happening at Maine's correctional facilities.

Only your vigilance on the outside can guarrentee that justice goes on on the inside.

If you'd like to contact one of our inmate bloggers, send us an email.

Thanks for reading, and thanks for your support.

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